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29th Judicial Circuit Court

MO

The 29th Judicial Circuit Court applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $887,194. The Jasper County Treatment Program (JCTP) will provide a postbooking connection to clinical treatment indicated by evidence-based needs for all offenders per screening for substance abuse, mental illness, criminogenic risk, and connection to enhanced treatment for family-based offenders. The program will also provide court-ordered referrals into the JCTP and referral into other offender programming as indicated for nonfamily substance abuse offenders, as well as develop individualized treatment plans for family-based substance abuse offenders. Also, the program will provide case management of JCTP participants targeting substance abuse and co-occurring disorders and communicate community treatment program participation requirements (i.e., probation conditions, such as mandatory counseling session participation, MAT plan compliance, drug testing, and court reporting). This project serves Jasper County (population 120,217). Priority considerations addressed in this application include eight high-poverty areas and a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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ADAMHS Cuyahoga County

OH

ADAMHS (Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Services) Cuyahoga County applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,196,326. The ADAMHS Board of Cuyahoga County, Ohio COSSAP project provided access to rapid assessment, MAT induction, and peer recovery supports to survivors of overdose of opioids or stimulants to divert them from future involvement in the criminal justice system. The creation of an MAT unit and peer support recovery services within a countywide Diversion Center addressed the BJA objective of reducing the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances, including a reduction in overdose fatalities, while also mitigating the impacts on crime victims. Establishment of the MAT unit and peer support began with one shift at the 24-hour Diversion Center, with all three shifts fully functioning by project year three. Enrollments totaled 98 and ceased operation on December 31, 2023.

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Alabama Department of Mental Health

AL

The Alabama Department of Mental Health is applying for a Category 2 award in the amount of $6,000,000. Project Possibilities: A Collaborative Alabama Criminal Justice Project will develop, implement, and expand a combination of law enforcement diversion programs; comprehensive and real-time data collection, analysis, and dissemination; and medication-assisted treatment and peer support recovery support services into existing systems of service in the state of Alabama across Calhoun, Dekalb, Etowah, Jefferson, Madison, Mobile, Montgomery, and Walker counties, serving an approximate population of 2,015,797. The project will serve utilizers identified within and across the criminal justice system including those in need of diversion from and preventing the return to the criminal justice system. Goals are to expand and implement diversion programs/services that provide treatment and recovery support to divert and prevent the return of opioid, stimulant, and other substance abusing/addicted individuals from/to the criminal justice system; extend the state data collection (Central Data Repository or CDR) of substance use information to include non-opioid substances; expand current partnerships to enhance data-sharing and accessibility, analysis, and dissemination of real time data; expand resources to rural areas, thus bridging the gap of care from urban and suburban areas to rural areas, including developing and implementing innovative and evidence-based models of MAT services for individuals interacting with the criminal justice system; and monitor the impact/outcomes of interventions, spreading successful intervention statewide at the completion of the project period to reduce incarceration, recidivism, morbidity, and mortality for adults with a substance use disorder who are cycling through the criminal justice system. The project includes partnerships between the University of Alabama's VitAL program, the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Paroles, the Recovery Organization of Support Specialist, and People Engaged in Recovery. Priority considerations addressed in this application include serving high poverty areas throughout the state, and the proposed activities will address Office of Justice Programs priority considerations including promoting civil rights, increasing access to justice, and building trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Alameda County Probation Department

CA

The Alameda County Probation Department (ACPD) is applying for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,195,323. Alameda County’s Residential Multi-Service Opportunity Center will expand access to responsive community alternatives to incarceration, as well as the county’s capacity to provide evidence-based mental health and substance use treatment services, built through a collaborative system of care that reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities, including a reduction in the number of overdose fatalities. This project serves Alameda County, a large, urban county with a population of 1.67 million. The project includes partnerships between ACPD and a qualified contracted service provider. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty area and a persistent poverty county, as well as enhanced public safety in federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Allegheny County

PA

Allegheny County applied for grant funding under Category 1a in the amount of $1,199,505 to build needed pre-arrest/pre-booking diversion pathways to harm-reduction services for individuals with SUD/COD — leveraging Allegheny County Department of Human Services’ (DHS) Pathway to Care and Recovery, the county’s new front door to treatment and support, as well as other crisis system resources. This project will support diversion from the criminal justice system at two crucial points: (1) pre-arrest, so that police officers can divert individuals to the Engagement Center, avoiding arrest and incarceration entirely; and (2) pre-booking, so that magisterial district judges can divert individuals from getting booked in the jail during their initial bail hearing. This project will also build upon planning efforts with various suburban municipalities who have expressed interest in teaming together to establish flexible options for pre-arrest diversion to mobile case managers Allegheny County’s proposed project for COSSAP addresses the high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone priority considerations, as it is intended to benefit individuals who reside in these areas and will improve public safety.

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Arizona Criminal Justice Commission

AZ

The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) is applying for Category 2 in the amount of $6,000,000. The Arizona Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP) will advance Arizona’s goal of reducing overdose deaths by providing services to people involved in Arizona’s local justice system. The ACJC will make a total of nine competitive sub-awards to local sites to implement law enforcement diversion programs or virtual peer recovery services. The ACJC will work collaboratively with the nine sites to serve the unique needs of each community, while leveraging the states resources, training experience, and expertise to implement impactful, evidence-based strategies. The ACJC will also build the capacity of the local justice system, including jails and local law enforcement agencies, to implement these programs through robust training and technical assistance, including peer-to-peer learning and cross-site coordination. The project serves the entire state of Arizona, which has a population of 7,421,401. The project includes partnerships with the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (the state agency for substance misuse services), the Tucson Police Department, Heritage Health Solutions, and the Arizona Sheriffs Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include making sub-awards to communities with a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; a lack of accessibility to treatment providers, facilities, and emergency medical services; and providing services to a high poverty area. Applicants will also be asked to demonstrate how their sub-award will further OJP’s priority of building trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

AR

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration will: • Support an overdose crime scene team consisting of a criminal investigator and a peer recovery specialist to assist law enforcement task forces/agencies in a minimum of six geographically diverse sites (counties, regions, or localities) within the state. • Increase access and enrollment to treatment, increase education and awareness, and evaluate the grant strategies identified in 25 localities within the state to address offenders who may be opioid abusers. The sites to receive subawards will be selected through a competitive process. Subawardees will be required to use overdoes detection mapping application program. An independent evaluator will be selected after the grant is awarded.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

AR

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration is applying for a Category 2 statewide area grant in the amount of $6,000,000. The Arkansas COSSAP Project will address the opioid epidemic strategically and continue providing support to areas that have been disproportionally impacted by the abuse of illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances, as indicated by a high rate of treatment admissions for substances other than alcohol; high rates of overdose-related deaths; and lack of accessibility to treatment and recovery services. The primary focuses of the proposed projects are comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; the development of peer recovery services and treatment alternatives to incarceration; and continued Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) overdose investigations involving peer recovery services and the implementation of strategies identified in the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Strategic Plan. This project serves specific counties where high rates of opioid deaths have been identified in COAP Category 2; however, the specific subrecipients for the proposed projects have not been selected. The project includes partnerships between the Department of Finance and Administration Office of Intergovernmental Services (DFA-IGS), Department Human Services, Office of State Drug Director, and the Single State Authority, in addition to a new partnership between DFA-IGS and the Arkansas Coroners’ Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to rural communities and the fact that the individuals (populations) intended to benefit from the project reside in high-poverty and/or persistent-poverty counties.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

AR

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration proposes to develop a statewide comprehensive opioid abuse plan that will include goals, objectives, and strategies addressing opioid abuse and misuse. The goals are to develop resources, recommend evidence-based practices, and create online tools that will aid Arkansas communities in reducing opioid abuse/misuse and related deaths and assist offenders with a history of opioid abuse. To meet the proposed objectives, the planning process will be facilitated by the planning consultant and consist of collaboration and partnerships from across state agencies and local entities. The required collaborative partner for this project is the Department of Human Services/State Drug Director, the state agency responsible for alcohol and substance abuse services. Other partnering agencies include the Department of Human Services/Office of the State Drug Director; representatives from the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program (HIDTA); the Administrative Office of the Courts; Arkansas Community Correction (ACC), Probation and Parole; Department of Human Services, Child Welfare; Governor’s Office–Senior Advisor for Child Welfare; Arkansas Sheriff’s Association; Arkansas Chief’s Association; Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care (AFMC); Arkansas Municipal League (an association of city/county governments); the City of El Dorado; and the City of Marianna. After the plan is finalized and approved, the state will move towards the implementation phase. The state anticipates providing up to 25 subawards to localities/communities. Representatives from these localities/communities will be trained, utilize developed resources, implement strategies identified in the comprehensive plan, and become designated opioid task forces.

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Atlantic City (Inc)

NJ

Atlantic City is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $600,000. The Atlantic City COSSAP program will focus on promoting public safety and supporting access to recovery services, strengthening data collection and sharing, aligning and maximizing resources, and preventing substance use. It will implement a comprehensive plan to reduce the risk of overdose death and enhance treatment and recovery engagement through recommendations made by the city’s overdose fatality review team, bringing together stakeholders with different perspectives and different data sets to improve public health and clinical practices. Strategies include enhanced outreach to overdose survivors and their families and enhanced targeting of high-frequency cases. Goals of the project include reducing the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities, reducing the number of overdose fatalities, and mitigating the impacts on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives, in part by enhancing the proactive use of prescription drug monitoring programs to support clinical decision making and preventing the misuse and diversion of controlled substances. The project serves Atlantic City, which has a population of 37,999. The project includes partnerships with the city’s Director of Public Health, the Jewish Family Services Department, Southern Jersey Family Medical Center, AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center Behavioral Health, the Atlantic City Police Department, the Atlantic City Municipal Court, and emergency medical services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Augusta County

VA

The Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office for the County of Augusta, Virginia, applied for grant funding in the amount of $600,000. This project serves Augusta County, a small, semi-rural county with the population of 74,701. The purpose of the project is to expand its currently existing LEAD program to serve the expanding number persons with substance use disorder. The grant will fund a new case management program, which will connect higher-risk, felony-level offenders with community resources prior to them being charged. The program will also institute a new transfer project, which will give medical professionals and first responders the ability to ensure continuity of care for clients presenting with SUD. The project includes partnerships between Augusta County Sherriff’s Department, Blue Ridge Court Services, Valley Community Services Board, Blue Ridge Criminal Justice Board, and the Institute for Reform and Solutions. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural designation for part of the County of Augusta in seven of its census tracts.

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Berkeley County Council

WV

The Berkeley County Council is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. The COSSAP program will provide peer recovery services to address treatment and intervention needs of Berkeley County students and their family members; strengthen social services where children have been impacted by drug addition to connect them to community services; and provide sustaining funds to Project AWARE, an ongoing initiative of the Berkeley County School System with an overarching goal to improve the mental health and wellbeing of all school-aged children (K–12). Working in partnership with Berkeley County Schools and the Martinsburg Initiative, the program, hosted by the Berkeley Recovery Resource Center, will reach beyond the student population and connect families to community resources to support those in recovery or seeking recovery from substance use disorder (SUD), reducing opioid use and the number of overdoses. The hiring of a full-time social worker in the school system and youth case workers will guarantee an impact across both the new juvenile drug court and existing juvenile and adult programs. The project will also support a therapist, a peer recovery coach, and two case managers and expand case management in the ten middle and high schools of Berkeley County. It will fund the purchase of naloxone kits and staff development through additional peer recovery training, in particular in support of juveniles. The program aims to reach approximately 10,000 school-aged children in Berkeley County through prevention and education activities and expects to directly assist approximately 400 students through mental health/therapy provision and 250 families struggling with SUD through the provision of peer recovery services. The project will incorporate the ODMAP data collection tool to track near real-time fatal and non-fatal overdose data. The project serves Berkeley County, with a population of 119,171. The project will include partnerships with Berkeley County Schools, EastRidge Health Systems, and the Martinsburg Initiative. Priority considerations addressed in the application include the disproportionate impact on the county by the misuse of illicit opioids and prescription drugs as evidenced in part by high rates of overdose deaths from heroin and other opioids and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Bernalillo County

NM

Bernalillo County in New Mexico will use grant funds to expand access to treatment and recovery support services across behavioral health, primary care, criminal justice, and emergency management services. Grant funds will be used to hire a full-time coordinator and two case managers. The county and partners will engage in comprehensive planning; create a mobile harm reduction center staffed by a nurse and the two case managers; increase medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for off reservation urban Indians; provide transitional housing for underserved youth and their families; and provide MAT to incarcerated youth. The University of New Mexico Institute for Social Research will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Bishop Paiute Tribe

CA

The Bishop Paiute Tribe applied for a Category 1c tribal/rural area grant in the amount of $592,023. The Healing Project will support life in recovery for people recovering from substance use issues by focusing on health, home, purpose, and community. The Healing Project will also incorporate a cultural camp for the recovering community that will provide the appropriate healing services within the context of the Paiute and Native American Indian culture while also implementing evidence-based practices. This project serves the local Native American population of the Owens Valley, California. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the high-poverty, rural, and underserved Native American population.

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Boone County

IL

Boone County applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $599,000. The Boone County Support Outreach Recovery Team will to fill the identified need for a community law enforcement officer to work with the individuals who have been arrested and fill the identified need for an addiction counselor to work with the county’s jailed population. The second purpose of this program is to fill the identified need for an addiction counselor who will work as a recovery coach with Boone County’s jailed population. This individual will deliver services such as moral reconation therapy and substance abuse counseling. This project serves Boone County, Illinois (population 53,606). The project includes partnerships between the Boone County Health Department, the multidisciplinary team, the Rosecrance, and the Belvidere Police Department.

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Boulder County

CO

The Boulder County Community Services Department is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $899,902. Project Recovery will implement evidenced-based treatment and recovery services, recovery housing, peer recovery support services, pre- and post-booking treatment alternatives to incarceration, and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). The project will provide services within a recovery home environment in a collaboration between the Boulder County Jail and Tribe Recovery Homes, a provider of home-based recovery and peer support services, and will feature collaborations with community service providers, including the county’s homeless system and housing authorities, workforce, and physical health service providers. Deliverables include establishment of three recovery homes; service provision to 207 clients over three years; development of referral procedures to identify justice system-involved participants with substance use disorders, with a special focus on individuals experiencing homelessness; and implementation of evidence-based therapeutic programs, peer recovery, and MAT services. The goals of the project are to end the cycle of incarceration, support the recovery and reentry process, reduce incidences of crime and recidivism, and create a safer community. The project serves Boulder County, with a population of 326,196. The project includes partnerships with the Boulder County Jail, Tribe Recovery Homes Inc., the Colorado Mental Wellness Network, Homeless Solutions for Boulder County, and the Boulder Community Health and Colorado Community Health Alliance. The project will engage the OMNI Institute as a research partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include supporting civil rights by limiting arrests due to substance use disorder and providing treatment and decreasing disproportionate minority confinement; protecting the public from crime and evolving threats by stopping the cycle of homelessness, substance use and incarceration, and the societal costs of substance misuse related to interdiction, law enforcement, prosecution, incarceration, and probation; and building trust between law enforcement and the community by providing alternatives to incarceration that demonstrate law enforcement’s commitment to appropriate care.

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Boulder County

CO

Boulder County applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $884,014. Project RENTR (Readiness, Engagement, Navigation, Treatment, and Recovery) will implement a range of allowable grant activities, including evidenced-based treatment services, peer recovery support services, pre- and post-booking treatment alternative to incarceration approaches, and court-based interventions. Project RENTR will increase services and treatment options for those with substance use disorders in pretrial/pre-booking, including those benefitting from a new Colorado law that reclassifies a misdemeanor drug felony as a misdemeanor. Project RENTR will also provide access to comprehensive screenings, assessments, case management, and treatment in the jail environment. The project will continue case management services for 90 days during the reentry process and accelerate access to community-based treatment options. This project serves Boulder County, Colorado, which has a population of 326,196. The project includes partnerships with the Boulder County Community Services Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty and persistent-poverty counties and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Butler County of Ohio

OH

Butler County of Ohio applied for Category 1B grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Butler County COSSAP project aims to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals within its communities, through reducing the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigating the impacts of on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives. This project serves Butler County, home to a population of 382,000. The project includes a partnership with Miami University’s Center for School-based Mental Health Programs. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges in a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Camden County

NJ

The Camden County Department of Corrections (CCDOC) applied for Category 1a grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Comprehensive Substance Use and Recovery Support Program for Incarcerated Individuals in the Camden County Correctional Facility (CCCF) will expand the department’s capacity to identify, respond to, treat, and support individuals incarcerated in the CCCF with a history of substance use, specifically individuals with a non- opioid use disorder. Through the use of substance use and recovery support services for individuals both pre- and post-release, this project serves Camden County, New Jersey, which has a population of approximately 513,000 across 37 municipalities. The project includes partnerships between Camden County Department of Health and Human Services Office of Mental Health and Addictions, CFG Health Network, and CCDOC’s contracted medical and mental health provider, as well as partnerships with Project HOPE, the Center for Family Services, Volunteers of America, Genesis Counseling Centers, and the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services. These agencies will support CCDOC reentry efforts, providing vital support to individuals such as housing, MOUD, SU, and mental health counseling, employment, and job-readiness training. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone. There are six objectives of the proposed program. Objective 1 includes the implementation of a substance use screening tool and assessment during the booking and classification phase to effectively identify individuals incarcerated with a substance use disorder. Objective 2 provides substance use counseling and support services for individuals (both in person and via telehealth) while incarcerated in CCCF. Objective 3 provides integrated care coordination for individuals during a period of incarceration to promote and foster health equity of the justice-involved population. Objective 4 provides peer recovery support services to individuals transitioning home following release from the CCCF through the development of Peer Support Teams. Objective 5 provides recovery support housing to individuals that have engaged in substance use and/or receiving MOUD and are housing insecure at the time of release from CCCF. Lastly, Objective 6 is focused on establishing a Reentry Release Center to include a team of CDACs to continue the coordination of services upon release from CCCF.

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Catawba County

NC

The County of Catawba applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to expand the current Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program by offering additional financial support for Officer training and engagement in order to grow the referral pool. Second, funds will be used to further develop an existing jail services program to include a more robust pretrial diversion program. Finally, funds will be used to implement a new transitional, reentry housing program to be utilized by both LEAD and jail services. This project serves Catawba County, North Carolina, with a population of 150,000 people. The project includes partnerships between the Cognitive Connection and Rebound Treatment Center. Catawba Valley Behavioral Health has existing relationships with the local sheriff’s department, five local police departments and the Districts Attorney’s Office through the LEAD program. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose and overdose death.

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Chesterfield County

VA

Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office is applying for grant funding in the amount of $1,192,430. This project serves the metro Richmond area with a population of over 500,000 and is submitted under Subcategory 1a. The purpose of the project is to provide specialized pretrial supervision to individuals at high risk for overdose and expand reentry planning and medication-assisted treatment to inmates. The project includes partnerships between the Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office, Chesterfield Community Corrections Services, Chesterfield Mental Health Supportive Services, other local agencies and a local evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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Citrus County

FL

Citrus County is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $387,581. The Citrus County Sheriff's Office Substance Abuse Social Worker Program will embed social services with law enforcement in order to rapidly respond to drug overdoses where children are impacted. Additionally, the Citrus County Sheriff’s Office intends to provide prevention, response, and diversion from the criminal justice system to individuals who are affected by substance misuse. The Sheriff’s Office will employ two substance misuse social workers to fulfill these goals. The substance misuse social workers will review and follow up on all reports of nonfatal overdoses, including contacting individuals who have experienced an overdose and connecting them with community-based resources. The substance misuse social worker will collaborate with child protective investigators with the Department of Children and Families (DCF), as well as case managers with Youth Family Alternatives (YFA). The social worker will communicate successes in treatment and assist in potential reunification of children and will also collaboratively work with DCF and YFA to connect children with early intervention therapy resources to reduce the likelihood of adverse childhood experiences affecting them. The Sheriff’s Office will also create and introduce a Marchman Act Assessment tool to be used in all non-fatal overdose cases. This project serves Citrus County, Florida, which has an approximate population of 149,657 residents. Partnerships include strong relationships with community partners, DCF, and YFA.

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City of Alamosa

CO

The City of Alamosa applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $599,997. The Specialized Case Management program will provide a non-arrest, community partner pathway to connect addicted individuals to intensive case management and harm-reduction resources using the evidence- based TASC Specialized Case management and Let Everyone Advance with Dignity (LEAD) model. The City of Alamosa is creating a system of care that will allow individuals to receive appropriate levels of service and treatment to address root challenges rather than utilizing a criminal justice system clearly not equipped to address substance use disorder effectively. The Specialized Case Management program will provide a third pathway into intensive case management, service coordination, and connection to harm- reduction resources. This project serves approximately 50,000 residents in the 12th Judicial District. The project includes partnerships between the City of Alamosa, Center for Restorative Programs, and the 12th Judicial District Office of the District Attorney. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the disproportionate impact of opioids and other substances on the region, the specific challenges faced by rural communities, and the high poverty area served by the project.

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City of Bismarck

ND

The City of Bismarck is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. Supporting First Responders Through Behavioral Health Interventions, Medication Assisted Treatment, and Connections to Care in the Emergency Department, a multidisciplinary overdose prevention, response, and referral model led by first responders, will serve as a bridge to intervene with overdose victims to transition them to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Bismarck Police Department will partner with Heartview Foundation, a licensed addiction treatment provider, and Sanford Health Emergency Department to increase utilization of MAT for individuals with opioid use disorder; utilize recovery support services in the Sanford Emergency Department (ED) to develop a bridge between emergency room, law enforcement/first responders, and individuals needing treatment; and increase the availability of naloxone. The project will also increase communication efforts to reduce stigma surrounding SUDs, opioid use disorders (OUDs), and MAT. Deliverables include interventions with 90 individuals who have experienced an opioid overdose, as well as an additional 80 patients referred from the Opioid Overdose Bridge. Sanford Health ED will train ten medical professionals and twelve support staff members on SUD, MAT, and procedures for the Opioid Overdose Bridge. The project serves the Bismarck-Mandan Metropolitan Area in North Dakota, with an estimated population of 126,990. The project includes partnerships with the Bismarck, Mandan, and Lincoln Police Departments, the Burleigh and Morton County Sheriff’s Departments, Bismarck-Burleigh Public Health, Custer Health, Sanford Health Emergency Department, Ministry on the Margins, and Heartview Foundation. The project will engage Dr. Erin Winstanley, Vice Chair of Research, Department of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry at West Virginia University School of Medicine, as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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City of Charleston

SC

The City of Charleston is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. The Charleston County Addiction Crisis Task Force Police Assisted Peer Recovery Program, a law enforcement diversion program that will fund three positions: one project coordinator to provide data collection and analysis services to all law enforcement agencies in Charleston County and two peer support specialists to support law enforcement officers while conducting outreach. The project will also expand Charleston’s existing partnership with the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) to include officer training, oversight of peer support specialists, and the design of multimedia products to inform officers and the community of this outreach initiative. The project will fund Critical Incident Management Software (CIMS) to facilitate communication between police-based outreach programs and treatment facilities to track follow-up success, with support from Kelley Research Associates (KRA) and ODMAP to facilitate real-time overdose follow-up communication across the county. The peer support specialists will deploy with trained QRT officers for the purpose of engaging individuals who recently suffered an overdose or presented signs of a substance use disorder during an interaction with law enforcement. They will be responsible for developing recovery plans to support overdose survivors as they transition to treatment. Harm reduction kits that include fentanyl test strips, clean injection equipment, naloxone, gloves, and information on local resources so that overdose deaths and other negative health outcomes associated with drug use can be reduced will be made available to survivors and at other locations. The goal of the project is to achieve a 15 percent reduction in the number of days from overdose to outreach. The project serves the City of Charleston, which is the nexus of the Charleston-North Charleston-Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area and has a population estimated at 713,000, with an estimated 411,000 in Charleston County. The project includes partnerships with the Charleston Police Department, the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office, the North Charleston Police Department, and the Mt. Pleasant Police Department, all of which have officers serving on the Charleston County Addiction Crisis Task Force (ACT Force). The project will engage Kelley Research Associates to implement the CIMS and to evaluate the program. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project will also benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas.

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City of Columbus, Department of Public Safety

OH

The City of Columbus Department of Public Safety applied for grant funding in the amount of $1200,000 under Category 1A. This project serves the 1,316,756 residents of the city of Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio. The Rapid Response Emergency Addiction Crisis Team (RREACT) EMS Outreach Unit is a unit within the Division of Fire’s Training and Emergency Medical Services Bureau and is supported by the Division of Police’s Crisis Response Team. RREACT EMS outreach members include firefighters/paramedics, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) certified peace officers, a substance use case manager, a registered SUD nurse, a family case manager, and trauma specialist. This multidisciplinary outreach team goes directly into communities to connect with opioid users who survive overdose, but then refuse EMS transport to the emergency room. The goal of the outreach unit is to proactively create connections and build relationships with opioid users. RREACT follows up with addicted individuals in the community within 48 hours of nonfatal overdose; checks in on their immediate health and wellness; provides resource information, and creates opportunities for users to link with harm-reduction supplies, treatment programs, and social service supports. RREACT actively partners with local treatment providers, public health departments, justice agencies, and Franklin County’s Family and Children First Council to achieve desired project outcomes. Gretchen Hammond with Mighty Crow, Inc. serves as the evaluator for the proposed project. The applicant is eligible for COSSAP priority consideration based on overdose rates in Franklin County and the City of Columbus and the project’s impact on increased public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Duluth

MN

The City of Duluth applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $899,055. The City of Duluth FY 2020 COSSAP Lake Superior Diversion and Substance Use Response Team Project will improve community outreach to overdose events by expanding outreach efforts to those with amphetamine-related substance use disorders and those who experience amphetamine-related overdoses. The program will reduce barriers between outreach contact and treatment, and maintain or expand current opioid response functions. This project serves St. Louis, Carlton, and Lake counties in Minnesota, as well as the city of Superior in Wisconsin. This region has a population of approximately 289,727 people. The project includes partnerships between St. Louis County Public Health and Human Services, St. Louis County Drug Court, and the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Duluth

MN

The City of Duluth is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $899,982. The Substance Use Response Team of the City of Duluth Police Department’s Lake Superior Drug and Violent Crime Task Force (LSDVCTF) proposes a program model that would expand upon the services it currently provides, allow for the program to assist more individuals regardless of drug of choice, and shorten times between overdose events and contact from the team, thereby allowing for quicker access to treatment. This project serves the entire LSDVCTF region, which includes St. Louis, Carlton, and Lake Counties in Minnesota, as well as the city of Superior in Wisconsin. This entire region has a total population of 288,732. The project includes partnerships between St. Louis County Public Health and Human Services, St. Louis County Drug Court, the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment, and SOAR Career Solutions. This project will engage Dr. Jeff Maahs from the University of Minnesota Duluth as the research partner for this project. Priority considerations addressed in this application include services and referrals in designated Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Fitchburg (Inc)

MA

The Fitchburg Police Department is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $504,063. The Fitchburg Outreach Initiative, a multidisciplinary program established in partnership with Community Health Link of Worcester, will incorporate referrals, prevention, response, case management, and education. This program is based on successful law enforcement diversion programs such as LEAD and PAARI. The Fitchburg Outreach Initiative will hire a full-time substance misuse clinician to be embedded within the police department to respond to opioid overdoses, substance use disorders, and co-occurring disorders in the City of Fitchburg. The clinician will provide follow-up and post encounter outreach to overdose survivors and their families. Additionally, the program will divert low-level offenders experiencing substance use disorders away from the criminal justice system and into treatment when it is safe and appropriate to do so. The Fitchburg Outreach Initiative will also launch an educational campaign highlighting prevention and resources available to families and survivors. The project serves the City of Fitchburg, which has a population of 40,882 residents. The project includes a partnership with Community Health Connections, a multi-faceted social and behavioral service agency that provides detox services, inpatient clinics, outpatient clinics, 24/7 urgent care for substance use disorders, a homeless shelter, mental health services, recovery services for youth, and family support services. Additional partnerships have since been created with GAAMHA which is an organization that provides a wide range of services including recovery support. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project will also benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas.

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City of Gallatin

TN

The Gallatin Police Department (Sumner County, Tennessee, population 191,283) — in partnership with the Sumner County Sheriff’s Office, local treatment provider Volunteer Behavioral Health, local courts, and scientific consultants — requests $892,085 from the Bureau of Justice Assistance FY 2020 Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program (Category 1b: Competition ID BJA-2020-17024) to implement a law enforcement-led substance abuse response to address the county’s increasing substance abuse problem. The proposed community-based strategy to address substance abuse and overdose risk will be implemented through enhancing connections to treatment; delivering evidence-based recovery services including needs assessment, individualized treatment plans, case management, medicated assisted treatment (MAT); providing a police-led awareness and prevention program to the county’s K-12 population, as well as a provision of Narcan to officer first responders. OJP priorities addressed include serving a designated Qualified Opportunity Zone, high-poverty areas, evidence-based services delivery, and program evaluation.

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City of Holyoke Police Department

MA

The City of Holyoke Police Department (HPD) applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $597,650. Project ERASE (Expansion of Recovery from Addiction to Substances Efforts) will implement a multicomponent intervention program designed to (1) support individuals with opioid, stimulant, and other illicit substance issues with interventions to reduce addictions and associated mental health needs, (2) reduce overdoses and overdose deaths through prevention and intervention strategies, and (3) reduce substance-related crime in Holyoke. This project serves Behavioral Health Network and Gandara, the Holyoke Police Department, Hampden County Sheriff, Holyoke Probation, and research partners. The project includes partnerships between the House of Corrections to provide detox treatment options and develop a law enforcement liaison between HPD, the courts, and probation personnel. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high-poverty area and enhanced public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Jacksonville

NC

The City of Jacksonville continues to utilize COSSAP 2019 funding with a focus on enhancing the services array with Transitional Housing Services assistance and Residential/Rehabilitation Treatment costs. Individuals identified within the COSSAP program who are eligible for transitional housing services or treatment services due to inability to provide these services for themselves will work with the Jacksonville Police Department’s Substance Abuse Counselor to locate and obtain these services through the Program.

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City of Lowell

MA

The Lowell Police Department is proposing to enhance and expand the Community Opioid-Outreach Program team (Lowell Police, Fire, Health, Trinity EMS, Lowell House) by adding a youth services coordinator to focus on the needs of children affected by the opioid epidemic, two outreach specialists to expand service to the homeless community by serving as a liaison between agencies to improve communication and connect their various resources, and conduct pro-active outreach to any individuals with substance use disorder before an overdose. Grant funds will support a coordinator, crime analyst, full-time clinical recovery specialist and youth services coordinator, outreach recovery specialist and research team. University of Massachusetts Lowell will serve as the research team comprised of researchers from Center for Community Research & Engagement, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, and Community Health and Sustainability.

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City of Madison

WI

The City of Madison Police Department proposes to enhance its pre-arrest diversion program with additional pathways to treatment that include self-referral, active outreach, naloxone plus (Quick Response Team), and officer prevention and intervention. Grant funds will be used to hire an addiction resource team comprised of an addiction resource officer, community paramedic, and certified peer specialist, as well as an assessment clinician for referred clients, program evaluator, and project coordinator. Additional funds will be used to purchase naloxone for community distribution. The project services residents of Madison and Dane County. Project partners include Public Health Madison and Dane County, Dane County Department of Human Services, Madison Fire Department, and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute (UW PHI). The project will engage Janae Goodrich of the UW PHI as the research partner.

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City of Menomonie

WI

The City of Menomonie Police Department (MPD) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $584,202. Project Hope will benefit juveniles and adults in the City of Menomonie and Dunn County by employing strategies that provide alternatives to arrest and access to treatment opportunities. Project initiatives include the evidence-based Botvin LifeSkills program for juveniles, formation of a Quick Response Team (QRT) based on the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiatives (PAARI) model, implementation of a juvenile offender diversion program, an amnesty program focused on providing treatment opportunities, creation of a sworn behavioral health officer position, utilization of software analytics to identify potential clients in need of treatment, and mentoring services for juveniles. MPD will partner with the Dunn County Department of Public Health to promote a local needle exchange program and to share information on how to acquire naloxone to raise awareness of resources available for individuals suffering from an opioid or methamphetamine addiction. Project Hope will also work with children suffering from adverse childhood experiences; once children are identified as being impacted by substance use, they will be offered services such as therapy and counseling. The project serves Dunn County, with a population of 45,368, and specifically the City of Menomonie, with a population of 16,404. The project includes partnerships with the Menomonie Fire Department, the Dunn County Department of Human Services, and the Dunn County Criminal Justice Collaborating Council. Priority considerations addressed in this application include building trust between law enforcement and the community; a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; and high rates of overdose deaths.

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City of New Orleans

LA

The City of New Orleans Health Department is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $900,000. The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program will support a team of LEAD direct service staff. This team will include a case management supervisor overseeing a team of case managers and peer support specialists tasked to provide services within the fidelity of the LEAD model. Major tenants of this approach include providing intensive case management services within a person-centered, trauma-informed, and harm-reduction framework. LEAD case management staff members work to address the root causes of behaviors that led participants to encounters with law enforcement. This approach also benefits the New Orleans Police Department by providing a long-term solution that has historically been addressed through the immediate response of an arrest. Goals of the initiative include reducing municipal arrests and re-arrests in the 8th District related to mental illness and substance use through LEAD diversions to case management, potentially expanding LEAD eligible charges to include simple possession of illicit drugs, and developing and implementing an evaluation plan. This project serves the city of New Orleans, which is contiguous with Orleans Parish and has an estimated population of 390,144. The project includes partnerships with the New Orleans Police Department, the National Alliance on Mental Illness New Orleans, the New Orleans City Attorney’s Office, the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice Coordination, the Orleans Public Defender’s Office, the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s Office, and the LEAD National Support Bureau. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a jurisdiction with high rates of overdose deaths and a project that will benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas or persistent-poverty counties, advance the promotion of civil rights, and build trust between law enforcement and the community.

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City of Newburyport

MA

Newburyport Police Department (NPD) in Massachusetts, one of the founding departments of the Essex County Outreach Program, proposes to expand the outreach program to encompass all of Essex County. The Essex County Outreach Program is a series of stigma-free entry points to treatment on demand. The program supports nonarrest or early diversion program models that reach people before they enter the criminal justice system. The program supports multiple law enforcement entry points to treatment, including self-referrals to the stations. Cross-sector collaboration and partnerships are key to the program’s success which is supported by clinicians, social workers, recovery coaches, and trained volunteers.

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City of Orlando

FL

The City of Orlando is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $685,458. The Orlando Police Department (OPD) Comprehensive Opioid Victim Advocacy and Enforcement Program will strengthen OPD’s overdose response efforts to both victims and families and free up investigators to close currently open cases. This will be accomplished, in part, by hiring two victim advocates who will focus on providing more in-depth victim services for survivors and families of overdose victims through embedded social services. The project will also increase investigator capacity to investigate overdoses and prosecute drug dealers by lessening the burden on investigators to follow up with families. We are also requesting funds for overtime pay for the sworn members of the Overdose Investigative Unit, who will have more time to focus on investigations and an increased caseload capacity once the victim advocates are hired and taking care of the social services aspects of the response to an overdose. Additional funds requested will allow three members of the Unit to travel to scheduled grant workshops in Year 2 and Year 3 of the grant. Funding is also being requested to provide the Overdose Investigative Unit with a laser Fentanyl detection device. This device will help to ensure the safety of the Victim Advocates, investigating officers, and the families of the victims as they will help create situational awareness of the presence of Fentanyl at overdose scenes. A second goal of the project will be to create safer communities by eliminating opioids and other illegal substances. To help facilitate this goal, we request funding for the purchase of one night vision device with a mount to facilitate agents’ ability to conduct surveillance in low-light environments. We will also utilize funds to purchase covert cameras to be placed in locations with high drug traffic activity. The covert cameras will be used to gather information on suspects and acquire probable cause for search warrants where drugs are being sold. It is anticipated that the footage captured on these cameras will help facilitate suspect identification and prosecutorial success while taking deadly drugs off the streets and helping save lives. We also request funding to purchase two high-powered computers to run a software product called Cellebrite Reader. Overdose investigations into opioid-related overdose deaths and the successful identification of the primary and additional suspects responsible often lead to collecting a suspect’s cell phone(s) as evidence. Once a search warrant is signed, the Digital Forensic Unit conducts a physical examination of the device. However, the Digital Forensic Unit has limited resources and time to undertake prolonged data analysis. Therefore, the device’s data is transferred to a hard drive and returned to the detective for research, review, and analysis utilizing a program called Cellebrite Reader, which allows for the quick and efficient review of large data files. While OPD currently owns the software, and it is being used successfully within its Homicide and Special Victims Units, the Overdose Investigative Unit requires the purchase of computers with architecture powerful enough to run it. These computers will not be on the City Network and will not be serviced through City IT. They will be instrumental in comprehensively and efficiently collecting data from suspects' cell phones, collecting evidence, and assisting with investigations. The combination of the night vision devices, the covert cameras, and the computers to run Cellebrite Reader software will help in our goal to increase investigator capacity to take dangerous opioids, stimulants, and other illegal drugs and those who sell them off the streets. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose deaths in the City of Orlando.

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City of Saint Paul

MN

The City of St. Paul Police Department (SPPD) applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $412,125. The Recovery Access Program (RAP) includes an embedded Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC) from the nonprofit organization People Incorporated to assist in connecting individuals with a substance use disorder or substance use related concerns to applicable services and supports, as well as responding after a non-fatal overdose incident to offer services and harm reduction resources. An SPPD officer is assigned to RAP to assist with the Naloxone Plus Model and Drug Surveillance Program. Funds are also used to hire an internal SPPD data analyst to collect and manage program performance and evaluation data for the purposes of program improvement and program sustainability beyond grant funding. This project serves the city of St. Paul’s population of about 310,000 individuals. The project includes partnerships with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Population Health Institute. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity zones and high-poverty area.

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City of Searcy

AR

The City of Searcy is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $600,000. The Searcy Police Department Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse (COSSA) project will promote a higher level of cooperation and collaboration among the local agencies; improve the effectiveness of law enforcement to combat illicit opioid use, possession, and distribution and to improve interdiction efforts through training that focuses on up-to-date and relevant information about opioid misuse protocols, the importance of sharing information statewide, and collaboration between Drug Task Force members and law enforcement in general; and support and offer assistance to those affected by opioid use and opioid overdose. This collaborative effort will produce more effective investigations, prosecutions, treatment, and recovery involving opioids. This project serves Searcy, the largest city and county seat of White County, Arkansas, which has a population of 23,660. The project includes partnerships between the Searcy Police Department, the White County Sheriff’s Office, the Prairie County Sheriff’s Office, the Lonoke County Sheriff’s Office, the Central Arkansas Drug Task Force, and health and rehabilitation community partners.

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City of Waterbury

CT

The City of Waterbury Department of Public Health is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. Waterbury’s Warm Hand-Off Program (WHOP) is a law enforcement and other first responder diversion program that offers a multidisciplinary overdose (OD) prevention, response, and referral-to-treatment model similar to LEAD and PAARI models. WHOP is designed to ensure early, immediate, and repeated referral to treatment for OD survivors by means of an OD Response Team modeled after Waterbury’s Crisis Intervention Team. WHOP will connect OD survivors at the scene of an overdose or at hospital emergency departments to harm reduction tools, family support services, and treatment for substance use disorders through the utilization of two full-time trained recovery coaches and Waterbury police partners. All first responders in the city, along with Waterbury Health Department and other city agencies, will collect and analyze data on opioid overdose by geographic information system (GIS) location, risk factors, and response efforts. The team will also enhance a targeted response to the highest-risk overdose survivors to improve their chances of survival and linkage to care. In addition, a cloud-based data collection software service will improve the capture, management, and retention of secure program-related data. The goal of the project is to reduce opioid overdose and overdose-related deaths in the City of Waterbury. The project serves the City of Waterbury, with a population of 110,366. The project includes partnerships with the Waterbury Police Department, the Waterbury Fire Department, the Office of the Mayor, the Waterbury Public Works Department, the Northwest Connecticut Public Safety Communications Center, American Medical Response & Trinity Health of New England’s Emergency Medical Services, the Greater Waterbury Health Improvement Partnership, and the New England High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. The project will engage the University of Connecticut as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project also provides an opportunity to build trust between law enforcement and the community and will benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas or persistent-poverty counties.

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City of West Allis

WI

The City of West Allis Fire Department (WAFD) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. The Mobile Integrated Health MAT Access Advocate Program (MAAP) will expand the range and capability of the West Allis Fire Department’s Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) team to facilitate MIH and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services to every Milwaukee County municipality, as well as support the development of training materials to allow for application of sustainable MIH practices across the entire county. WAFD’s MIH team pairs a community paramedic and a certified peer recovery support specialist who provide targeted outreach and facilitate new enrollments or reengagements to MAT services, reaching the opioid use disorder (OUD) population via either real-time, 24/7 response to overdose emergencies or visitation to patients referred to the program from local and regional partners. MAAP will connect with each participating municipality’s local framework to establish a referral process and connect the local effort to broader regional efforts. A local hospital will provide MAT (including buprenorphine induction), mental health screening with counseling, and warm handoffs to primary care and community MAT clinics. MAPP will educate police, fire, and health departments in all Milwaukee County suburbs on how they can adopt the West Allis OUD outreach practices. MAAP will also work with county stakeholders to ensure children impacted by substance misuse receive required services. The project serves Milwaukee County, which comprises 19 municipalities and has a population of 945,726. The project includes partnerships with the Medical College of Wisconsin, the Milwaukee County Assistant District Attorney, the Milwaukee County House of Corrections, the Milwaukee County Opioid Fatality Review team, the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office, the Milwaukee Fire Department Opioid Response Initiative, the Wisconsin Department of Health Service, and the Milwaukee County Office of Emergency Management. The project will engage Dr. Jennifer Hernandez-Meier of the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin as the primary research and evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants, high rates of overdose deaths, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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City of Woonsocket

RI

The City of Woonsocket Police Department is applying for a Category 1, Subcategory 1b award in the amount of $819,109. The Woonsocket LEADER in Treatment Program will implement the Law Enforcement Assisted Deflection, Engagement, and Retention (LEADER) in Treatment program. The LEADER in Treatment program will divert individuals with a substance use disorder or co-occurring disorders before formally entering the criminal justice system at the post-arrest/pre-prosecution stage.  The service area for this program is regional.  The program will be based out of the city of Woonsocket, although the program will also serve residents of Lincoln (population 21,105), Cumberland (population 35,263), North Smithfield (population 12,582), Pawtucket (population 72,117), Central Falls (population 19,568), and Providence (population 179,194) who are routinely arrested by the Woonsocket Police Department due to geographic proximity. The project includes partnerships between Community Care Alliance. This project will engage Rulo Strategies LLC, which will partner with researchers from Brown University as the research partner for this project. Priority considerations addressed in this application include that Woonsocket has been disproportionately impacted by the opioid crisis and is a community with a high rate of poverty.

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Clackamas County, Health Housing and Human Services

OR

Clackamas County applied for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under Category 1B for the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Plus project. This project serves the 424,747 residents of Clackamas County, which consists of urban, suburban, and rural areas spanning 1,879 square miles (larger than the state of Rhode Island). The goals of LEAD Plus were to continue and enhance Clackamas County’s LEAD program and to support aligned system work. Clackamas County has achieved the first of these goals by securing sustainable funding for LEAD. The LEAD program in Clackamas County offers support for individuals experiencing unmet needs associated with homelessness, mental health, and substance use. Through outreach, intensive case management, and system navigation, it aims to reduce involvement in the criminal justice system. LEAD is now administered by a different division within Clackamas County, operating without grant funding. The Children, Family, & Community Connections Division is continuing to implement LEAD Plus through efforts to coordinate substance use and overdose prevention initiatives in the county, increase the capacity of the local public safety system to address systemic issues that will reduce disparities, and implement efficient strategies for data collection. Key partners included in this project include the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Milwaukie Police Department, Clackamas County’s Health, Housing and Human Services Department, and local behavioral health, housing, and substance use prevention and treatment professionals.

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Clermont County Mental Health and Recovery Board

OH

The Clermont County Mental Health and Recovery Board (CCMHB) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $858,171. The project will enable the expansion of existing Quick Response Teams (QRTs) in Clermont County. The CCMHRB will expand two of the three QRTs, with a focus on improving outreach and treatment connection rates; increase QRT outreach provided by the Clermont County Sheriff Office's (CCSO) QRT; enhance the QRTs to include a mental health professional to address mental health concerns encountered on QRT outreach attempts; and hire a coordinator to implement a "Handle with Care" program to provide support to children who encounter an overdose and/or have had their parents involved in recent drug charges. The goal of the project is to reduce overdoses and provide connection to treatment and support services for individuals with an opioid misuse disorder and/or a stimulant misuse disorder and their families/loved ones. It is estimated that 300 Clermont County residents will be served by the project annually, including youth and adults. The project serves Clermont County, a largely rural county with a population of 208,234. The project includes partnerships with the CCSO, Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health, Child Focus (a children’s mental health provider), and local school districts and law enforcement agencies. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project also provides an opportunity to build trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Cocke County, Tennessee, Government

TN

Cocke County Government, located in the rural Appalachian Mountain region of eastern Tennessee, applied for grant funding under Subcategory 1b in the amount of $899,488. This project serves Tennessee's 4th Judicial District, which includes Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, and Grainger counties and has a total combined population of 212,069. The purpose of the proposed Tennessee Recovery Oriented Compliance Strategy (TN-ROCS) Enhancement and Evaluation project is (1) to increase the capacity of this innovative court-based intervention program to link individuals across the district at high risk of overdose to appropriate, evidence-based behavioral health treatment and recovery support services; and (2) to independently validate the TN-ROCS model, such that key findings related to program quality and implementation fidelity can inform current and future data-driven expansion efforts. This project includes partnerships between Cocke County, 4th Judicial District Circuit Court Judge Duane Slone, Dr. Stephen Loyd, Dr. Jennifer Anderson, American Institutes for Research, and Rulo Strategies. All four priority considerations are addressed in this application. Cocke County is a geographically isolated rural area that is plagued by persistently high rates of poverty, substance use, and overdose fatality. Additionally, one census tract within Cocke County (9207.00) has been designated as a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

CO

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000. The Colorado Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Project will support comprehensive, collaborative initiatives in selected areas through a competitive request for applications from local public health, law enforcement, and substance use treatment providers serving residents in seven rural counties to conduct one or more of the BJA allowable uses of the funding to meet the specific local needs. Deliverables of the project include the selection and provision of at least six subawards within six months of the grant award, at least six contracts and scopes of work, a BJA-required implementation manual, an annual summary of the site project, project accomplishments from each site (sub-award), coordinated cross-site training and peer-to-peer learning, quarterly process data, annual evaluation data, and a written evaluation report at the end of the grant period. This project serves seven rural counties: Bent, Costilla, Crowley, Huerfano, Otero, Prowers, and Saguache. The project includes partnerships between the Prevention Services Division of CDPHE and the Office of Behavioral Health of the Colorado Department of Human Services, as well as local public health, law enforcement, and substance use treatment partners in the seven counties. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural and high-poverty areas containing economic opportunity zones. Partner agencies and activities will be specified after a competitive Request for Applications is released in February 2021, the applications are reviewed, and awards are made.

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Commonwealth of Massachusetts dba Middlesex Sheriff's Office

MA

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, dba Middlesex Sheriff’s Office, applied for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,152,729. The Involving Families in Treatment of Inmates with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) Project will reduce opioid overdose deaths and improve treatment outcomes for inmates with opioid use disorder by providing naloxone to family members and involving them in treatment. Through an enhancement of the Medication-Assisted Treatment and Directed Opioid Recovery (MATADOR) Program — which provides naltrexone, buprenorphine, methadone, and case management services — the proposed project activities include: (1) development and implementation of naloxone trainings and naloxone distribution for family members of inmates with OUD; (2) provision of a comprehensive family services program for inmates with substance use disorders, including outreach to engage families in the project, educational programs for families on substance use disorder, family counseling, and support groups, and (3) an evaluation of the project’s impact in improving treatment outcomes and reducing the risk of overdose deaths. This project serves Middlesex County, located in northeastern Massachusetts. Middlesex County, the most populous county in New England, has 1.6 million residents. The project includes partnership with Brandeis University. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin or other opioids and high rates of overdose deaths.

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Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Sheriff's Department Hampden

MA

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Sheriff’s Department Hampden applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $900,000. Hampden County Sheriff’s Department’s All Inclusive Support Service Program will reduce opioid-related overdoses and related fatalities. The program will take a multipronged approach to (1) enhance a database in Hampden County that will allow for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of comprehensive, real-time overdose information, and (2) implement a law enforcement, first responder-driven multidisciplinary overdose prevention, response, and diversion referral model known as the Rapid Response and Connection Program. This project serves Hampden County, Massachusetts, which has a population of 470,406. The project includes partnerships between the Hampden County Sheriff’s Department, Office of the District Attorney, Baystate Medical Center, Trinity Health Mercy Medical Center, local law enforcement entities, and other established community partners. Priority considerations addressed in project include the disproportionate impact from substance use on a rural, high-poverty census tract and public safety impact in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

CT

The Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (DMHAS) is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $5,999,998. The Community and Law Enforcement for Addiction Recovery (CLEAR) Project is a multilateral, community-based opioid overdose response program that will be piloted in six jurisdictions across Connecticut. The CLEAR Project will establish partnerships between community agencies and law enforcement to increase connections to care for people with a substance use disorder (SUD) and create a collaborative response to addiction among community partners. For each jurisdiction, the CLEAR Project will conduct assessments; implement an IPIS/Cordata Integrated System for data tracking and referral management; establish a coordinated safety net of recovery coaches and overdose response teams; support families, including through the identification and referral to services of children impacted by a family member’s SUD; increase access to medication-assisted treatment; and implement a community-based, data-driven dispatch response to surges in overdoses. The goal is to create a replicable model for overdose response that can be scaled in communities across the entire state. Sites were selected based on need, population diversity, and readiness to implement the program. The project serves Bridgeport, Greenwich, Norwalk, Torrington, Winsted, and the State Police Troop B and State Police Troop L service districts; together, the districts represent much of Fairfield and Litchfield counties. The project includes partnerships between DMHAS and the McCall Center for Behavioral Health, Liberation Programs Inc., the Bridgeport Police Department, the Greenwich Police Department, the Norwalk Police Department, the Torrington Police Department, and the Winsted Police Department. The project will engage Dr. Carol Gregory and Dr. Kelly Firesheets as evaluation partners. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rates of overdose deaths. The project will also benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas.

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Cook County Health

IL

Through this funding, Cook County Health will (1) convene the Cook County Community Recovery Learning and Action Network to address recovery housing capacity and coordination; (2) begin development of a real-time, regional recovery housing information system, including collection, analysis, and dissemination across partners; (3) with partners, conduct a feasibility study for a low barrier, harm reduction and recovery-oriented, transitional housing model for justice-involved individuals with SUD to address gaps in the current recovery housing landscape. Work towards a pilot in years 2 and 3; and (4) support recovery home beds and recovery support services for corrections-involved individuals. This project serves Cook County, Illinois, which has 5.2 million residents. The project includes partnerships with transitional and recovery housing providers, substance use treatment providers, criminal justice partners, state agencies, community-based partners, and public health organizations. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas, and this project will offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities (Qualified Opportunity Zones).

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County of Page

VA

The Page County Sheriff’s Office proposes to develop the Page County Cognitive Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Project that will provide cognitive behavioral treatment for individuals who are involved with the justice system as a result of their opioid use. The project includes a coordinator to manage the operations of a day reporting center where individuals can receive individual or group sessions in person or via teleconferencing. The project will fund equipment for the telehealth component and will serve the county of Page and the towns of Rileyville, Luray, Stanley, and Shenandoah. Project partners include Page County Sheriff’s Office, Page County Jail, Luray Police Department, Stanley Police Department, and the Shenandoah Police Department.

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Crook County

OR

The Crook County Health Department’s Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Prevention Program will identify and implement an evidence-based law enforcement and first responder diversion program; build capacity with the school district and law enforcement for education and prevention programs for K-12; enhance real-time data collection, analysis, and dissemination; increase access and accessibility to harm reduction strategies such as naloxone distribution and medication take-back programs; and assess needs and capacity for supporting medication-assisted treatment within the local jail, in addition to local recovery and support services. This project serves Crook County, a rural community in Oregon with a population of 25,562. The project includes partnerships between the Crook County Health Department, the Crook County Sheriff’s Office, the Prineville Police Department, BestCare Treatment Services, Rimrock Trails Treatment Services, the Crook County School District, Central Oregon Health Counsel, the Pain Standards Taskforce, St. Charles Health Systems, and Crook County Fire and Rescue. Those who will benefit from CCHD’s COSSAP project include individuals with opioid use and other substance use disorders, community partner organizations, and the community as prevention curriculum is implemented into Crook County School District K-12 and outreach and educational materials are provided to the entire population.

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Cumberland County

ME

The County of Cumberland applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $899,824. The Bridges for ME: Person-Centered Recovery and Reentry Project will focus on the development of an advisory council with at least five community partners and memorandums of understanding with five diverse treatment providers and annual screenings of 1,200 people for SUD/OUD conditions, while offering of 600 people resource referrals and naloxone. The project will also provide an annual provision of group support and reintegration planning to 200 people in jail, as well as intensive reentry services for 150 individuals receiving community service, including MAT and peer navigator services for 60 days. This project serves Cumberland County, population 281,674. The project includes partnerships between Cumberland County Jail, Maine Pretrial Services, Co-occurring Collaborative Serving Maine, Amistad, SMART, Maine Department of Corrections Probation, Portland Police Department, MAT providers Catholic Charities Maine, Spurwink Adult Behavioral Health Services, Maine Behavioral Healthcare IMAT, Northern Light Portland Internal Medicine, and Discovery House. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Cumberland County as a region disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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Cumberland County (Inc)

NJ

The County of Cumberland (Inc) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. Fighting Relapse Effort Employing Drug Offense Monitoring Plus (FREEDOM+) is a collaborative diversionary program that will offer treatment and key peer recovery supports as a critical intervention that interrupts perpetuated criminal behavior. Additional harm reduction, prevention, and intervention efforts like Narcan distribution and education, fentanyl test strips, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's National Drug Take Back Initiative, and integrating Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) and Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) programs are the "plus" part of this project to support community members fighting to be substance free. The FREEDOM+ program aims to drive those caught in the cycle of relapse and drug-seeking behavior toward treatment on threat of legal consequence, while setting up the participant for success with compassionate peer recovery support services. This project serves an estimated 600 defendants who will be offered, through their defense counsel, an opportunity to participate in FREEDOM+, with hopes that the offered opportunity and supports will motivate as many as 50 percent of participants to remain compliant into sustained recovery. The project includes partnerships with the Cumberland County Department of Human Services (CCDHS), which is a primary partner in implementing FREEDOM+, and its substance misuse programs. CCDHS operates a state licensed treatment facility where they will administer Comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Evaluations and provide a quality, evidenced-based, multi-faceted approach to address substance use problems for individuals and families. CCDHS also operates the Capital Recovery Center, which will be instrumental in managing the progress of defendants participating in FREEDOM+ and providing holistic peer recovery supports. This project will engage Rutgers University’s Walter Rand Institute (WRI) as evaluator. FREEDOM+ advances the U.S. Department of Justice priorities in three ways: by increasing access to justice, protecting the public from crime and evolving threats, and building trust between law enforcement and the community. In addition, Cumberland County meets the Office of Justice Programs priority of being a high-poverty area.

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District of Columbia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner

DC

The District of Columbia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (DC-OCME) has applied and been granted a Category 1a rural area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. DC-OCME Toxicology Opioid and Illicit Drug Surveillance (TOIDS) will reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities, including a reduction in the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigate the impacts on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives like conducting forensic toxicology laboratory testing of illicit drug misuse and novel testing for opioids. In addition, it will be analyzing comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and streamlining the forensic toxicology lab testing methodology through Lean Sigma Six (LSS) training of staff and LSS reform of the lab. Products include a sustainable LSS lab and staff, a comprehensive reference of new opioids, and free online resources on DC-OCME’s web page. DC-OCME will disseminate best practices with community partner and advocates. This project serves the District of Columbia with a population of 702,455. The project includes partnerships between the Network for Victim Recovery of D.C., D.C. Forensic Nurse Examiners, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, D.C. Department of Transportation, D.C. Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants, and D.C. Department of Health. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the poverty priority, the persistent poverty counties priority, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Douglas County Community Service Board

GA

The Douglas County Community Services Board (DCCSB) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $1,196,998. The Douglas County COSSAP Postbooking Pilot program will be implemented by DCCSB and the Recovery Community Organization (RCO) within the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office's Jail Division (DCJ) to identify and refer individuals needing substance misuse treatment. DCCSB will provide treatment, including medication-assisted treatment, referring out individuals who need more intensive treatment. Participating individuals will be connected to the Never Alone Clubhouse, a safe space where members of the recovery community can form positive connections. Upon completing treatment, individuals will receive a certificate of completion for judges to consider for charges and sentencing. Additionally, DCCSB aims to increase access to care by helping individuals overcome financial hurdles to receiving treatment: individuals will receive an average of $2,000 of treatment services in lieu of court-mandated services. The pilot also seeks to separate substance misuse treatment from the judicial system to increase the number of individuals seeking treatment and improve engagement. DCJ will refer approximately ten individuals per month. The final goal is to connect individuals to a peer recovery community to decrease the likelihood of substance misuse and increase the likelihood of discontinuing criminogenic behavior. By the end of the project, 360 individuals in Douglas County will have the option of connecting with RCO for peer support before trial. The project serves Douglas County, which has a population of 148,981. The project includes partnerships with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office's Jail Division and RCO. Priority considerations addressed in this application include promoting the civil rights of access to care and building trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Essex County Sheriff's Department

MA

The Essex Medicated Assisted Treatment Recovery Project (EMATRP) will be expanding and enhancing its current MAT program and support services pre- and post- release through these initiatives: (1) enhancing the current MAT program with care continuum coordinators, (2) providing pre-release harm-reduction education for all MAT participants to include naloxone upon release for 3,000 inmates, and (3) partnering with Spectrum for clinical stabilization services beds to provide participants with transitional housing and peer recovery for up 825 inmates. This project serves Essex County in Massachusetts with a population of 800,017. The project includes partnerships between Wellpath. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware

DE

The Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware - Criminal Justice Council will implement new opioid-intervention programs in five geographically diverse localities: Dover (Kent County), Smyrna (Kent County), Millsboro (Sussex County), Seaford/Laurel (Sussex County), and Georgetown/Lewes/Milton (Sussex County). The project goals are to: (1) increase the number of law enforcement diversion programs; (2) reduce overdose deaths; (3) increase transitional housing availability; and (4) increase services for youth impacted by opioid overdoses. One initiative will involve establishing pre-arrest or post-arrest law enforcement diversion programs (using the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative [PAARI] model) for individuals who commit low level, nonviolent, drug-related offenses by utilizing community-based substance abuse and behavioral health services. The project will also include identifying cases where youth are impacted by an overdose and providing evidence-based responses, providing transitional or post recovery housing for individuals, and improving the collection/integration of data by purchasing a statewide case management system for law enforcement and Delaware’s Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health.

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Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator

FL

The Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator proposes that five established family dependency drug courts increase the number of families they serve and it proposes to institute/enhance peer-support programs; incorporate medication-assisted treatment; establish substance use disorder prevention programs for the children whose parents are participants in family dependency drug court; execute evidence-based, parent-child relationship-strengthening programs; strengthen peer-to-peer collaboration among sites with an annual all-sites meeting and cross-site visits; and increase training and technical assistance regarding substance use disorder and opioid use disorder. This project serves family dependency drug courts in Broward, Palm Beach, Orange, Marion, and Citrus counties. Dr. Barbara Andraka-Christou and her team from the University of Central Florida will serve as the evaluator for this project.

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Franklin County

OH

Franklin County, Ohio, applied for grant funding under Category 1A in the amount of $1,200,000. This project will serve individuals incarcerated at the Franklin County Jail and screened as at-risk for substance use dependency and drug-related overdose. The purpose of the project is to (a) reduce drug-related overdoses and deaths, (b) increase peer support and treatment referral and linkage, (c) increase access to medication-assisted treatment pre- and post-release, and (d) decrease recidivism. The Fast Track to Treatment initiative includes partnerships with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin County Municipal Court, Southeast Inc., Alvis180, and PrimaryOne Health. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a program model that focuses services in a county with a demonstrated disproportionate number of drug overdose deaths (43.3 overdoses per 100,000 as compared to the U.S. rate of 20.7 overdose deaths per 100,000) and program implementation intended to improve public safety by targeting services in federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones. Dr. Gretchen Clark-Hammond, CEO of Mighty Crow, shall serve as program evaluator for the proposed project.

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Franklin County Municipal Court

OH

Franklin County Municipal Court applied under Category 1A for grant funding in the amount of $903,289 to support and enhance its MAT, Assessment, Referral, Care and Hope (MARCH) project. This project serves Franklin County and the areas surrounding Columbus, Ohio, with an estimated population of 922,223. The purpose of the project is to continue to fund, expand, and enhance the court’s MAT program — an innovative and effective collaborative effort among Franklin County and City of Columbus justice and government stakeholders. Grant funds would continue to support the positions of MAT project manager and one community case manager through 2023. Enhancements would add an additional community case manager and a contracted peer support specialist to significantly increase the capacity of the program, opening more days to in-custody referrals and facilitating the offering of a full-time behavioral health walk-in clinic. The project includes partnerships between Franklin County Municipal Court, Columbus City Attorney, Office of Justice Policy and Programs, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin County ADAMH Board, and a variety of community behavioral health providers. The MARCH program will enhance public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Gaston County

NC

The Gaston County Government is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $899,999. The Gaston County Comprehensive Project to Improve Outcomes for Children Impacted by Substance Abuse will align county entities, substance misuse treatment providers, law enforcement agencies, courts, health care providers, and the faith-based community to provide an integrated system of referrals and services for children victimized by the opioid crisis. Under the supervision of Gaston County Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Children and Family Division, a therapeutic center will be established to provide therapeutic services for children in foster care who have been referred to the center by courts, direct therapeutic services for children lacking health insurance, counseling and therapeutic services for foster care children removed from their homes because of substance misuse, a county initiative to support rehabilitation rather than incarceration for opioid users, and outpatient substance misuse treatment. Gaston County HHS will also initiate a Therapeutic Visitation Center for the targeted population.

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Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

GA

The Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $2,289,701. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) establish a multi-locality naloxone initiative to include continued training for law enforcement personnel and provide funding to assist with the replenishment of the opioid reversal drug; (2) establish and implement a pre-arrest/post-booking diversion program for youth and adults who have a moderate to high risk of substance abuse within Athens-Clarke County; (3) provide K-12 youth in Athens-Clarke County with increased access to education and treatment; and (4) provide a comprehensive, real-time, information collection database for the City of Savannah to expand the pre-arrest diversion program, which is funded through the FY 2018 Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site Program (COAP). This project serves serve 23 of Georgia’s 159 counties. The project includes partnerships between Athens-Clarke County Unified Government and City of Savannah.

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Grays Harbor County

WA

The County of Grays Harbor is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $600,000. The Grays Harbor County Jail System of Care Expansion project will expand services by increasing capacity in the Grays Harbor County Jail to serve individuals who have a psychostimulant disorder as well. This expansion would include additional staff time for medical monitoring, managing recovery groups, and bolstering re-entry supports. The project will develop and implement a comprehensive plan to reduce the risk of overdose death and enhance treatment and recovery service engagement among the pretrial and post-trial populations leaving the county jail. This includes implementing medication-assisted treatment, cognitive behavioral treatment, wellness recovery planning, and re-entry care navigation within the county jail and supporting the transition to community-based services once released from custody. The goal of this expanded system of care is to increase the number of affected individuals returning to the community with established sobriety and behavioral health supports, decrease morbidity and mortality for those individuals, and decrease recidivisms among this population. This project serves Grays Harbor County, which has a population of just over 75,000 people. The project includes partnerships between the Grays Harbor Sheriff’s Office, the Coastal Community Action Program, Medtriq Suboxone Clinic, Lifeline Connections, Columbia Wellness, Grays Harbor Therapeutic Court (Superior Court), and the Grays Harbor County Commissioners.

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Guam Behavioral Health and Wellness Center

GU

The Guam Behavioral Health and Wellness Center (GBHWC) applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Guam Family Recovery Program will provide swift American Society of Addiction Medicine assessments and placement when deemed appropriate. The program will also offer peer support services to identified clients and decrease the time from arrest to access possible treatment for clients suffering from the ills of substance use. A total of 450 assessments will be performed throughout the grant period. This project serves the community of Guam. The project includes partnerships between GBHWC, Department of Corrections, Superior Court of Guam, TOGHE, OASIS, and the Salvation Army Lighthouse Recovery Center.

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Hamilton County Addiction Response Coalition

OH

Hamilton County applied for Category 1A grant funding in the amount of $1,000,000. The Hamilton County Addiction Response Coalition (HC ARC), under the proposed quick response team (QRT) expansion program, will address and has already addressed a number of the overarching goals of the solicitation, specifically, encouraging cross-system planning and collaboration among officials who work in law enforcement, pretrial services, courts, probation and parole, child welfare, reentry, prescription drug monitoring programs, and emergency medical services, as well as health care providers, public health partnerships, and agencies that provide substance abuse treatment and recovery support services. The QRT expansion plans to engage current community stakeholders, as well as new community stakeholders and partnerships beyond the coalition to target hot-spot areas. The QRT will continue to expand its on-the-ground efforts by utilizing HC ARC member organizations to not only provide outreach and resources to individuals suffering from addiction, but also the organizations they frequent to arm them with tools and resources. HC ARC has established a coordinated multidisciplinary response team that includes law enforcement, treatment providers, government representatives from the county and city, and a program administrator. This project serves Hamilton County, population 817,473. The project includes partnerships between Hamilton County Public Health Department and the Talbert House. There are no priority considerations addressed in this application.

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Hancock County

OH

The Hancock County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $600,000. The Recovery Community Organization Outreach Project in Hancock County, Ohio, will enhance recovery support services (RSS) and peer recovery support services (PRSS) and increase access to transitional or recovery housing for individuals 18 years and older who have a history of opioid, stimulant, or other substance use disorders and are either at risk or involved in the criminal justice system in Hancock County. The project activities will aim to expand availability and access to recovery housing and peer recovery support services, increase coordination of services between criminal justice and recovery support service systems, and conduct an evaluation of the project’s impact. The main goals of the proposed project are to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and the community (i.e., reduce recidivism and nonfatal overdoses) and reduce the number of overdose fatalities. This project serves Hancock County, which has a population of approximately 75,000 people. The project includes partnerships between FOCUS: Recovery and Wellness Community, LOFT (a youth drop-in center program), Recovery Homes, Family Resource Center, the Hancock County Sheriff’s Office, the Adult Probation Department, Findlay Municipal Court, and the Findlay Mayor’s Office. This project will engage Brandeis University’s Institute for Behavioral Health as the research partner.

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Henderson County/Henderson County Health Department

NC

The Henderson County Health Department, through the County of Henderson, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The funds will be used to expand access to recovery support services. The program seeks to provide peer-delivered services with a focus on rehabilitation and recovery, utilizing North Carolina certified peer support specialists and care coordinators. Services provided by the certified peers include psychosocial rehabilitation, habilitation, family support and training, short-term crisis intervention, and empowerment. This project serves a suburban area or medium-sized county with a population between 100,000 and 500,000. The project includes partnerships between Henderson County’s Behavioral Health Summit, Free Clinix, and Hope RX.

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Hennepin County

MN

The Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $1,067,674. The Peer Support and Community Outreach Program will enable HCSO to expand peer recovery support services to individuals in custody, as well as recovery support services including transitional or recovery housing. It will also expand community access to drug-take services. The HCSO, in partnership with Bold North Recovery and Consulting, will conduct community outreach and education efforts among residents at community events, which will feature distribution of medication disposal bags, education about the dangers of opioids, signs of addiction, treatment options, and the proper administration of naloxone. The HCSO will partner with Heritage Health Solutions to pilot Heritage CARES, a virtual peer recovery support services program, for which Heritage Health Solutions will provide training to key detention staff members. The project will conduct 24 community education sessions annually and distribute 1,200 drug disposal pouches and 2,499 naloxone kits. It will also provide virtual peer recovery support services for up to 435 residents. The project serves Hennepin County, which has a population of 1.3 million residents spanning 600 square miles. The project includes partnerships with Bold North Recovery and Consulting and Heritage Health Solutions. A priority consideration addressed in this application is building trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Hocking County

OH

Hocking County is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $539,464. The Hocking County Overdose Prevention and Harm Reduction Project will expand the county’s deflection programming from a Quick Response Team (QRT) called QRT Hocking Overdose Partnership Endeavor (HOPE) into one that partners with outside agencies by funding positions that link students and families to treatment and services for substance use disorders. The project will subcontract with a mental health practitioner within the Logan-Hocking School District (LHSD) and a deflection specialist within the Hocking County Health Department who will work directly with overdose victims and their families or those identified as being at a higher risk for having an overdose, as well as monitor a new crisis hotline within the health department and facilitate outreach and education into the community. LHSD will house the mental health practitioner within the high school and middle school in order to meet with students who have encountered an overdose or drug use, either among themselves or their families. The practitioner will be responsible for participating in the Handle with Care Program, an evidenced-based program designed to assist children in their school setting if a law enforcement encounter has happened inside their home. A multifaceted public awareness and education campaign will be created to increase the number of families who call the hotline. The goal of the project is to expand collaboration and partnerships among providers and agencies in Hocking County and to expand the existing framework of services to include stationary positions within fixed, strategic locations where students and families affected by the drug crisis frequent. The project serves Hocking County, a rural area with a population 28,264. The project includes partnerships with the LHSD and the Hocking County Health Department. The project will engage Wes Gilkey as a research partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the promotion of civil rights, support to crime victims, and building of trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Hoopa Valley Tribal Council

CA

The Hoopa Valley Tribal Court is applying for a Category 1C award in the amount of $600,000. The Hoopa Tribal Wellness Court Pre-Booking Enhancement will support ongoing operations and service expansion under its Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Court. This project intends to increase and standardize services for individuals with substance use disorder and opioid use disorder. While many of these individuals are court-involved, services will also be made available to anyone seeking assistance, with priority for special populations. The special populations include pregnant women, individuals with or at-risk of HIV/AIDS, older adults caring for a minor child due to foster care involvement, and individuals entering the community from incarceration. This project utilizes a hub-and-spoke model to centralize service delivery for Wellness Court participants and increase favorable outcomes as they journey to health. Funding for medication-assisted treatment is requested to help assure that individuals working through opioid misuse have the support needed through full recovery. This project serves enrolled citizens of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN), and AI/AN citizens enrolled in other tribes living within the jurisdictional boundaries of the Hoopa Valley Tribe. The Hoopa Valley Tribe and its reservations are within Humboldt County, California. The project includes partnerships between the K’ima:w Medical Center, the Court's Probation Services, and the Judicial Project Advisory Team.

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Hyde County Health Department

NC

Through the implementation of its Substance Awareness Program, Hyde County Health Department (HCHD) aims to work collaboratively with community partners to reduce substance misuse, overdoses, and deaths, and disease transmissions & infections (related to intravenous drug use) by increasing the utilization of treatment & harm reduction resources; supporting people who use drugs (PWUD) and those in recovery; and providing education to PWUD, their families, and the general community.

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Indiana Family and Social Services Administration

IN

The Indiana County Leaders Collaboration for Change (ICLCC) will establish and/or build upon existing collaborative relationships between first responders, the criminal justice system, child welfare and foster care, behavioral health, primary care and addiction service providers to identify, develop (or) enhance, and implement specific countywide programs designed to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities. The counties will achieve this by developing (or) enhancing and implementing one or more of the following within their county: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model programs (new to Indiana), prebooking or postbooking treatment alternative-to-incarceration programs, education and prevention programs to connect law enforcement in schools, embed social services with law enforcement to rapidly respond to drug overdoses where children are impacted, and expand access to evidence-based treatment and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. This project serves individuals across Knox, Wayne, Fayette, Floyd, Clark, Allen, and Madison counties. The project includes partnerships between the Division of Mental Health and Addiction and seven county coalitions. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural, high-poverty, and economically distressed regions.

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Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

IA

The Iowa Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy will: • Reduce substance abuse and criminal involvement involving nonviolent individuals by implementing or expanding pre-/post-arrest diversion to treatment in Black Hawk, Story, and Jones Counties. • Expand citizen access to medication disposal in 25 new sites in underserved areas of the state. The Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning Agency, Iowa’s Statistical Analysis Center, will serve as the evaluator for the project.

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Judiciary Courts of the State of Oklahoma

OK

The Tulsa County District Court, Fourteenth Judicial District of Oklahoma, is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The project will launch the Tulsa County Anti-Recidivism Misdemeanor Diversion (TURN) Program, a court-based intervention program (mixed pre- and post-plea model) that expedites treatment and recovery services for justice-involved individuals with substance use disorders, mental illnesses, and co-occurring SUDs/MIs who are at high risk for overdose. TURN requires that participants engage with service and treatment providers in exchange for dismissed charges, no court fines or fees, and fewer court dates, among other benefits. By prioritizing stabilization and long-term social success, TURN will improve outcomes for individuals whose current primary source of treatment is the Tulsa County Jail. Deliverables include 1,000 misdemeanor cases diverted out of the criminal justice system and 800 alternative sentence recommendation outcomes. The program will be administered by Tulsa County Alternative Court Programs (TCACP), a division of the court. The project serves Tulsa County (OK), with an estimated 2019 population of 651, 552. The project includes partnerships with the Tulsa County District Attorney, the Tulsa County Public Defender, the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, the Mental Health Association of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Family & Children’s Services, the Tulsa Police Department, and the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office. The project will engage Oklahoma State University’s National Center for Wellness and Recovery as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include protecting the public from crime and evolving threats in a region disproportionately impacted by substance use, as evidenced by a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Justice and Community Services

WV

The Justice and Community Services (JCS) Section of the West Virginia Division of Administrative Services (DAS), which is the State Administrative Agency for criminal justice-related activities in the state, is applying under Category 2 for grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000 under the FY 2020 Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program (COSSAP) grant program. The purpose of the project is two-fold. First, the project will establish a cutting-edge approach to pre-arrest diversion by integrating quick response teams, LEAD, and the West Virginia Angel Initiative (Angel) to establish the WV QLA Early Intervention Program. This program will be implemented into the following nine counties: Berkeley, Cabell, Kanawha, McDowell, Mercer, Monongalia, Raleigh, Wood, and Wyoming. The total population of these counties is 763,728 and accounts for 61 percent of the overdose fatalities within West Virginia. Second, the project will assist county commissions and non-profit organizations to assist with the recruitment, retention, and training of peer recovery coaches throughout the state. Coaches will be required to possess the following credentials to be funded under this initiative: 1) a high school diploma or recognized equivalent; 2) experience with substance use challenges; 3) involved with a personal support and/or recovery system; 4) reside in stable, recovery-oriented housing the last six (6) months; 5) have no involvement with the legal system within the last six (6) months and/or pending legal issues; and 7) no intensive behavioral health involvement within the last six (6) months, including intensive services, detoxification services, and/or residential treatment services. JCS has partnered with the West Virginia Office of Drug Control Policy and West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources Bureau for Behavioral Health in the implementation, monitoring, oversight, and sustainment of the proposed project. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural and high-poverty areas.

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Kittitas County

WA

The Kittitas County COSSAP Project will develop and implement an evidence-based medication-assisted treatment in jail to address individuals who are incarcerated and suffer from an opioid use disorder.

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Lancaster County

SC

The entire county of Lancaster is 98,012 residents. The proposed project will provide resources for training of every law enforcement officer in the county on LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion); promote visible prescription drug takeback strategies; and assist with training, handling, and distribution of naloxone. Priority considerations include the presence of a Qualified Opportunity Zone, poverty, and rural challenges. This application is for Category 1c grant funding.

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Lane County

OR

Lane County Sheriff’s Office applied for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under Category 1B. The project serves Lane County, Oregon, which has a population of 382,067. The purpose of the Lane County Jail Substance Use Intervention and Transition Program is to stand up a comprehensive in-jail medication assisted treatment (MAT) program with community transition through peer support and transitional housing. The in-jail program will be paired with peer support, which will facilitate a transfer to the program’s primary partner, Lane County Health and Human Services, MLK Community Health Clinic. The clinic houses the county’s MAT program and behavioral support unit. The program will also offer transitional housing support to encourage MAT engagement with community providers. The program will use multiple housing providers in order to best meet the needs of participants (for example, veterans and those with co-occurring disorders and higher or lower service needs,). Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose deaths and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. Additionally, the proposal will provide enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities (Qualified Opportunity Zones).

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Lenoir County

NC

The County of Lenoir applied for Category 1b grant funding for the amount of $288,713. The purpose of the project is to improve capacity of the district’s Family Accountability and Recovery Court (FARC) to serve families involved in the family court system due to substance dependence. Project objectives include providing more seamless and comprehensive treatment, as well as recovery services to parents with substance use disorders through increased staff capacity, enhanced training and professional development, and expanding treatment and complementary services. The project also aims at addressing systemic barriers faced by parents with substance use disorders through family transitional housing and expanded transportation assistance, as well as improving FARC performance through evaluation and performance management. This project serves North Carolina’s 8th Judicial District (Lenoir, Wayne, and Green counties). The total population of the district is 201,483. The project includes partnerships between Lenoir County, the 8th Judicial District FARC program, Hope Restorations Inc., Kinston Community Health Center, and the National Center for State Courts. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges, high and persistent poverty, and improved safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Lewis and Clark County

MT

The County of Lewis and Clark applied to Category 1c grant funding and will be recommended to receive $513,850. It proposes to implement the Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Bridges Project, which will support the delivery of treatment in the detention center for individuals with opioid use disorder. MAT medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, provide an evidence-based, holistic patient approach to the treatment of opioid dependency. The county is requesting funding for MAT medications and medically necessary lab work, as well as to support staff to implement the MAT Bridges program in the detention center. The MAT Bridges program is projected to increase retention in treatment for individuals upon release into the community and decrease recidivism rates for MAT Bridges participants. This project serves an estimated population of 69,432, including both rural and urban communities in the county. The project includes partnerships between the county’s Criminal Justice Services Department, the County of Lewis and Clark Sheriff's Office and detention center, and two local federally qualified health centers. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a rural area.

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Lincoln County

OR

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office (LCSO) is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $599,999. The LCSO-SBIRT project will implement a screening, brief intervention, treatment, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program aligned to the COSSAP funding purpose of expanding comprehensive efforts to identify, respond to, treat, and support people impacted by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other drugs. This project serves Lincoln County, with the service population being adults 18 years of age and older who are booked into the Lincoln County Jail and who prescreen positive for risky substance use behaviors. The LCSO SBIRT program will serve 200 people over the life of the project. The project includes partnerships between ReConnections; Amy Yates, LCSW, Justice Counselor; and Data Specialist Brooke O’Byrne. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the fact that Lincoln County has five high-poverty census tracts in an area disproportionately impacted by substance use (e.g., lack of community treatment and high rates of overdose deaths), and the project will advance justice and build trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Los Angeles County

CA

The Los Angeles Department of Health Services proposes to implement a Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program in the geographic area of East Los Angeles. Grant funds will be used to hire staff of the LEAD program including an attorney, sheriff’s deputies, and a Project Coordinator. Funds will also be used to secure reentry case management, transitional housing services, and purchase naloxone for distribution. Project partners include the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, and community-based organizations. The applicant will engage Ricky Bluthenthal of the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California as the research partner.

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Los Angeles County

CA

The County of Los Angeles is applying for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Office of Diversion and Reentry (ODR) will (1) expand law enforcement referral opportunities to divert individuals who commit low-level drug and prostitution offenses as a result of unmet health, behavioral health, and socioeconomic needs away from the criminal justice system and into supportive services by broadening eligibility criteria to include individuals with histories of stimulant, opioid and/or other substance use; (2) reduce the number of individuals in Hollywood with unmet substance use, mental health, housing, employment, or health needs entering the criminal justice system for low-level offenses; and (3) increase access to harm-reduction services and case management, including overdose education and access to naloxone for Hollywood LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) participants. This project serves the City of Los Angeles (population 3,949,776). The project includes partnerships between ODR, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, Community Health Project Los Angeles (service provider), and Dr. Ricky Bluthenthal from the University of Southern California.

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Louisville Jefferson County Metro Government

KY

Louisville Jefferson County Metro Government is applying for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. The MAT Expansion Project, known as IMPACT—Innovative Medication Program for Addiction Care and Treatment, aims to increase access to medications for Opioid Use Disorder in the jail. The project will expand in-custody access to MAT to reduce overdose deaths, reduce criminal behavior, and improve treatment retention and treatment outcomes for the population with moderate to severe opioid use disorder (OUD). Goals of the project include: increase access to MAT to incarcerated individuals already enrolled in a community opioid treatment program or office-based opioid treatment program prior to arrest, increase access to MAT by initiating two FDA-approved medications (methadone and buprenorphine) for OUD, improve treatment retention by providing in-custody behavioral therapies for substance use disorder and referral and linkage to care in the community upon release, and developing protocols to control medication diversion and offer ongoing staff training to address safety and security and the stigma associated with MAT as a treatment modality. This project serves the Louisville Metro City/County with a combined population estimated of 771,517. The project includes partnerships between Wellpath, and the MORE Center.

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Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

WA

In the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Program application, the Makah Tribe is proposing to utilize funding under Category 1: Local or Tribal Applicants, Subcategory 1c. The applicant intends to utilize funds from this application to continue funding the two FTE positions from the previous application: the COSSAP case manager and one coordinator, who will implement the LEAD program, develop MAT protocols, and help further expand the Sisuk Houses. There are no priority considerations for this application.

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Marion County

IN

The County of Marion is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $1,163,404. The Marion County Sheriff's Office’s (MCSO) Increasing MAT Capacity program will increase medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program capacity to fund a full scale, comprehensive MAT program that focuses on three parts: continuation, induction, and community connectivity. MAT in this program refers to the use of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to treat substance use disorders as a medical disorder. There are three FDA-approved medications used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD), and two will be used in this program: buprenorphine and naltrexone. This program will screen all arrestees at Marion County Jail Intake for OUD, continue MAT treatment for patients that self-report at Marion County Jail Intake to be currently enrolled in a MAT program, identify at-risk patients and induct on MAT, and ensure patients are connected to health insurance and MAT in the community prior to their release. This project serves Marion County, which includes the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, and has a population of approximately 101,020. The project includes partnerships between MCSO, MCSO’s Behavioral Management Team, Wellpath, and Midtown Community Mental Health. Priority considerations addressed in this application include that the individuals who will benefit from the project live in high-poverty areas.

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Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

MA

The Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court applied for a Category 2 statewide grant in the amount of $6,000,000. Project NORTH (Navigation, Outreach, Recovery, Treatment, and Hope) will increase treatment engagement and retention, decrease risk of overdose, and reduce risk of justice-system involvement. The objectives of the project are to increase access to evidence-based treatment and care coordination, decrease barriers to treatment retention, increase recovery support and recovery capital, and increase access to overdose-prevention education and naloxone distribution. This project serves 62 communities in 9 counties and 2.7 million people. Locations include Barnstable, Boston, Brockton, Chelsea, Haverhill, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Quincy, Springfield, Taunton, and Worcester. The project includes partnerships between the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, MassHealth (Medicaid office), Department of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, the University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School's Center of Excellence for Specialty Courts, and the Massachusetts Alliance for Sober Housing. Priority considerations in this application include rural regions, high-poverty areas, and Qualified Opportunity Zones. Please note that Marisa Hebble currently leads this initiative as Project Director, not Jessica Fix. Ms. Fix is registered in JustGrants as Grant Award Administrator and is responsible for administrative/fiscal oversight. We are unable to update this field as it locked in the web form.

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Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

MA

The Trial Court of Massachusetts, on behalf of six states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), will establish a New England Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI). This project will support comprehensive cross-system planning and collaboration among officials who work in multiple justice and justice related settings while staying focused on the judiciary and judiciary stakeholders (e.g. law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation and parole, child welfare, reentry, prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), and emergency medical services, as well as health-care providers, public health partners, and agencies that provide substance use disorder treatment and recovery support services). The New England RJOI will also develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health information-sharing partnerships that leverage key public health and public safety data sets and implement interventions based on this information. The project will have a researcher and is presently completing contract negotiations for these services. Please note that Abby Kuschel currently leads this initiative as Project Director, not Jessica Fix. Ms. Fix is registered in JustGrants as Grant Award Administrator and is responsible for administrative/fiscal oversight. We are unable to update this field as it locked in the web form.

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Mendocino County

CA

Mendocino County Behavioral Health and Recovery Services (MCBHRS) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $600,000. The Bridge Program will identify individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) and other substance use disorders (SUDs) and start them on medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in custody and case manage them to MAT and/or substance use treatment services at clinics and Mendocino County Behavioral Health Substance Use Disorders Treatment (SUDT) sites pre-release. The program will continue to follow these individuals post-release and support them however possible. The program will fund a behavioral health case manager to work full time within the jail and perform comprehensive case management and discharge planning. The project serves rural Mendocino County, which has a population of 86,749. The project includes partnerships between MCBHRS and the SUDT, Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office, Mendocino Community Health Clinics, and Mendocino Coast Clinics. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County

TN

The Metro Public Health Department proposes to implement the Opioid Overdose Reduction Program which will implement a robust overdose monitoring and data reporting system, to drive the strategic planning of the Overdose Reduction Workgroup, a multi-disciplinary team of over 26 agencies and organizations. The program will conduct an analysis of the severity of the opioid crisis in Nashville and provide much needed data to community stakeholders. Additionally, they will implement an Overdose Fatality Review Team to further investigate overdose causes, trends and opportunities for earlier intervention. Grant funding is requested for: a full-time comprehensive opioid abust program coordinator and full-time epidemiologist, .35 FTE opioid response coordinator will carry out project requirements.

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Miami-Dade County

FL

The County of Miami-Dade is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $1,200,000. The Miami-Dade County Advance DirEcted Prevention and Treatment (ADEPT) Program will provide evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), as well as recovery support services, including transitional or recovery housing and peer recovery support services, to opioid users. This project will use funding to expand access to rate limiting services for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment services within a well-established service network using existing proven evidence-based practices, deliver social media messaging to increase prevention for at-risk populations and access to available services for those with SUD in the social networks of those receiving SUD services in our community, and deliver social media messaging to increase prevention for at-risk populations and access to available services for those with SUD in high-risk zip codes in our community. This project serves Miami-Dade County, the most populous county in Florida, with over 2.7 million residents. The project includes a partnership with Thriving Mind South Florida. This project will engage Dr. Anthoni Llau of the Florida Department of Health in Miami-Dade County as the research partner for this project. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities and to emergency medical services, specifically mental health treatment.

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Michigan Department of State Police

MI

The Michigan State Police (MSP) is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $5,675,564. The MSP COSSAP project will provide subawards to multiple community agencies in seven counties (Genesee, Grand Traverse, Kent, Lake, Muskegon, Newaygo, and Shiawassee) across Michigan that have not previously received Bureau of Justice Assistance funding to develop and expand their overdose prevention programs. The selected counties are a mix of rural and urban jurisdictions that have experienced a high overdose burden, have limited access and resources to substance use treatment services compared to other counties in the state, and are ready to implement their programs within the required time frame of the grant. Strategies include development and expansion of quick response teams, law enforcement embedded social workers, jail-based medicated-assisted treatment with recovery coaches, law enforcement assisted diversion, naloxone for first responders, and drug checking sites; the latter will be the first program in Michigan to pilot this service for people who use drugs. The project will also support drug take back events. The MSP will partner with local agencies to ensure that there is no duplication of funding. The goal of the project is to reduce the rate of overdoses and the racial/ethnic disparities in overdose mortality rates in order to help families and communities heal and recover. The project serves Genesee, Grand Traverse, Kent, Lake, Muskegon, Newaygo, and Shiawassee counties, with a total population of 1,458,377. The project includes partnerships between MSP and local public health departments, community organizations, and law enforcement agencies in each of the participating counties. The project will engage the University of Michigan School of Nursing as an evaluation/research partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Middle District Attorney's Office

MA

The Worcester County Regional Outreach project at the Middle District Attorney’s Office (MDAO) enhances county-wide response to substance use, misuse, and abuse for non-fatal overdoses and children affected by opioids. This program implements a post-overdose follow-up strategy using the Critical Incident Management System (CIMS) to track fatal and non-fatal overdose incidents. CIMS allows overdoses to be tracked in real-time and alerts the follow-up team of the need for a home visit. Police and clinicians or recovery coaches make home visits within 72 hours of a non-fatal overdose and provide the survivor and their family with resources and referrals for service. Services are also offered for any children involved with the incident or individual. The Worcester County Regional Outreach project has the following goals: 1) To reduce the number of unintentional overdose deaths in Worcester County; 2) To increase the number of individuals receiving treatment and recovery support services in Worcester County; 3) To improve outcomes for children affected by substance abuse; and 4) To build a sustainable model for long term substance abuse and overdose prevention.

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Milwaukee County

WI

Milwaukee County, with an estimated population of 945,726, through the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office and in collaboration with the Milwaukee Community Justice Council, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and a variety of public health and public safety partners, sought $1,200,000 in Subcategory 1a grant funding to create a Milwaukee Overdose Public Health and Safety Team (OD-PHAST). This project would expand and further coordinate current efforts to address overdoses, as well as overall substance misuse issues across the county. The OD-PHAST project aims to: (1) expand the delivery and analysis of near real-time data between multiple public health and public safety partners; (2) utilize both aggregate data and insights from case reviews to develop strategies and recommendations for changes to reduce the likelihood of future overdose incidents; (3) increase capacity to deliver timely toxicology findings to public health and safety partners; (4) enrich understanding of fatal overdose risk factors through expanded next-of-kin interviews; and (5) connect families impacted by overdose, particularly children, to services to mitigate the impact of the trauma experienced. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Minnehaha County

SD

Minnehaha County applied under Category 1b for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under the reporting umbrella of the Minnehaha County Sheriff’s Office. This project serves the population of Minnehaha County, which includes a population of 186,749 residents. The purpose of the project is to reduce reliance of the criminal justice system to deal with individuals with substance abuse disorders. The project includes partnerships between Minnehaha County (Sheriff’s Office, SAO, Human Services), the Sioux Falls Police Department, Avera Hospital, Urban Indian Health, and the University of South Dakota. The program-specific priority area the applicant will address is the lack of accessibility to treatment providers. The OJP policy priority area the applicant will address is to enhance public safety in four Qualified Opportunity Zones. The applicant will partner with researchers in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of South Dakota to submit performance measurement and related assessments (including a gap assessment) to make data-informed decisions. These deliverables will also include assessments of the peer navigator and associated program. Final reports will be produced that summarize community crime changes and analysis of benefits to Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Minnesota Department of Public Safety—Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

MN

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) will support the “Timely Treatment, Strengthened Service, and Effective Evaluation for Overdose Prevention: Linkage to Care Across Minnesota” project to achieve the following objectives in eight sites: • Reduce opioid misuse and opioid overdose death by supporting local efforts to implement effective opioid overdose prevention projects. • Support local efforts to implement treatment and recovery support linkage activities serving individuals vulnerable for drug overdose. • Support implementation of local multidisciplinary intervention models to bring together stakeholders with different perspectives and different information to identify drug overdose prevention strategies. • Enhance access to naloxone among people who use drugs to decrease overdose deaths. • Enhance successful local multidisciplinary overdose prevention activities to decrease overdose deaths. • Evaluate the extent to which additional funding to eight opioid overdose prevention projects, referred to as “Tackling Opioid Use With Networks (TOWN)”, impact the incidence of overdose in communities. • Create a TOWN Manual in collaboration with the communities to support the expansion and sustainability of the TOWN model. The eight sites will implement three evidence-based activities: (1) peer recovery specialists in emergency departments; (2) treatment linkage by emergency medical services; and (3) overdose fatality review teams. The project will also enhance six Minnesota Department of Public Safety-funded syringe services programs by providing each site with naloxone to distribute to participants who use opioids. Dr. Catherine Diamond from the Minnesota Department of Health will lead the project evaluation.

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Mississippi State Department of Health

MS

The Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) is applying for a Category 2 statewide area grant in the amount of $6,000,000. The Mississippi Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program will implement universal SUD screening with comprehensive evidence-based SUD interventions delivered through collaboration between patient and provider. They will improve the timeliness and quality of drug overdose information on death certificates and the transfer of this information electronically to support the rapid exchange of death information. The program will select an appropriate web-based naloxone administration training portal to train law enforcement and other first responders on administration of naloxone and expand the availability of naloxone to those that receive training. Also, the program will extend and expand access to evidence-based treatment interventions through MSDH county health departments. This project serves all citizens of the state of Mississippi, a predominately rural state with a population of 2.9 million residents. The project includes partnerships between the Mississippi Public Health Institute, Mississippi Office of Forensics Laboratories, and the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural, high-poverty areas, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Missoula County

MT

The County of Missoula and the Missoula County Attorney’s Office are applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $600,000. The project will expand the Missoula County Prosecution-Led Pretrial Diversion Program, called Calibrate, which currently diverts low-risk, first-time offenders from criminal charges, in order to assist higher-risk individuals with drug charges or substance use disorders, providing them an opportunity to seek treatment rather than face criminal charges. The project will hire new staff members, including a diversion specialist, and will contract with two licensed addiction counselors. Its objectives are to serve more participants, to screen and enroll additional candidates into the program, and to monitor their progress. It will also provide participants with chemical dependency evaluations and develop a referral list of substance use providers to provide easier access for participants. The project serves Missoula County, an area of 2,600 square miles with an estimated population of 121,630. The project includes partnerships with the state Office of Public Defenders, the Missoula County Detention Facility, local law enforcement agencies, and justices of the peace. The project will engage the University of Montana as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include protecting the public from crime and evolving threats in a region disproportionately impacted by substance use, as evidenced by a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Montana Department of Corrections, Crime Control Bureau

MT

The Montana Board of Crime Control will develop a comprehensive plan that identifies policies and practices to assist local communities and providers in engaging and retaining offenders with opioid use disorder in treatment and recovery services and to increase the use of diversion in Montana. After the plan is completed, grant funds will be used to support the development of local, sustainable diversion programs and projects that link offenders to treatment and recovery services in priority communities. The primary partner for this project is the Addictive and Mental Disorders Division of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS).

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Municipio de Bayamon

PR

The Municipality of Bayamon in Puerto Rico applied under Category 1B for grant funding in the amount of $890,070 for the purpose of implementing a Bayamon Whole-of-Community Opioid Overdose and Crime Reduction Initiative. This project serves the Bayamon population of approximately 207,960. Its primary deliverables include planning documents for information sharing, naloxone deployment and training, public safety and K-12 schools education and early threat detection, Safe Community response initiatives, and treatment outreach improvements to support high-impact overdose victims such as homeless individuals, veterans, and youths. For priority considerations, the applicant meets the criteria for an above 20 percent high-poverty area, as U.S. Census data indicates Bayamon's poverty rate is 37.4 percent. In addition, Bayamon has documented in Qualified Opportunity Zone reports 60 Census track areas with 58 that are designated as low-income communities.

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Muscogee Creek Nation

OK

The Muscogee Creek Nation Department of Health (MCNDH) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $600,000. The MCNDH COSSAP Program will work across Muscogee Creek Nation (MCN) tribal programs to identify adult citizens who are at risk or suffering from opioid use disorder (OUD); train law enforcement officers, emergency management personnel, and rural volunteer firefighters throughout the MCN reservation; and expand treatment for patients. MCNDH will partner with the MCN Lighthorse Police Department (LHP) to administer the grant. The project will hire a project coordinator and a client navigator to establish a relationship with a medication-assisted treatment provider; provide annual professional training to all providers at all tribal health clinics; review and update policies and procedures on opioid treatment and administration; and review the process to identify, screen, assess, and refer OUD patients. The project will also purchase 300 naloxone kits to provide to law enforcement officers, emergency management personnel, and rural volunteer firefighters upon completion of naloxone administration training; purchase two 38-gallon drug disposal bins to be placed at two locations within the reservation for disposal of unwanted, unused, or expired controlled substances; and purchase 2,500 drug disposal system pouches. The project aims to provide case management and peer support for at least 100 patients; training for 300 law enforcement officers, emergency management personnel, and rural volunteer firefighters throughout the MCN reservation on how to identify an opioid overdose and how to administer naloxone; and training for 500 MCNDH staff, law enforcement officers, emergency management personnel, and rural volunteer firefighters to identify patients for potential OUD. The project serves the Muscogee Creek Nation, which has a population of 91,053 across 11 counties in east-central Oklahoma. The project includes partnerships between MCNDH, LHP, the MCN’s Social Services Program, the Indian Child Welfare Program, and the Family Violence Prevention Program. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Nevada Office of the Attorney General

NV

The Nevada Office of the Attorney General (NOAG) is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $5,751,772. The project involves enhancing existing or implementing new drug deflection/diversion programs undertaken by Mobile Outreach Safety Teams (MOST) or Forensic Assessment Services Triage Teams (FASTT), increasing provision of naloxone, and conducting drug take-back days to address drug/mental health crisis situations. MOST is a jail and hospital diversion program whereby public safety personnel and behavioral health clinicians collaborate to address the behavioral health needs of people involved in or at risk of involvement in the criminal justice system. FASTT provides assessment and case management for individuals who are screened as moderate to high risk using the Ohio Risk Assessment System and those with mental health and co-occurring disorders. The project serves seven sites from Nevada’s 16 counties and one independent city: Carson City, Churchill, Douglas, Lincoln, Lyon, Nye, and Storey. The subaward sites consist of three designated rural areas, three designated frontier areas, and the smallest urban area in Nevada. The project includes partnerships between the NOAG and the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services and community coalitions. The project will engage the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR’s) program evaluation team as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose deaths and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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New Hampshire Department of Justice

NH

The New Hampshire Department of Justice (DOJ) is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $4,710,993. The project will enable the expansion of the Prevention, Enforcement, & Treatment (PET) Program, which is designed to help lower recidivism rates of overdose victims and provide support to families of those struggling with substance use disorders (SUDs) by tasking a police officer to respond to overdose calls in a jurisdiction and to connect individuals and their family members to lifesaving resources. The project will expand PET from Laconia to six other counties across the state in partnership with Amoskeag Health, a nonprofit health care provider who, along with the Manchester Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team Technical Assistance Center (ACERT TAC) will enable a multigenerational approach to SUD. The ACERT TAC will provide training and resources for the communities to ensure their networks of programs and services are trauma-informed. The project will integrate PET and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) into the first responders’ curriculum when responding to calls related to drug use. PET will offer a core of services to the families of individuals with SUD while identifying and utilizing resources from Manchester ACERT TAC to address the ACEs in children. The project serves the State of New Hampshire, which has an estimated population of 1,377,529. It will focus on the jurisdictions of Laconia, Belmont, Berlin, Claremont, Londonderry, Manchester, and Merrimack. The project will include partnerships between the New Hampshire DOJ and the Belmont Police Department, the Berlin Police Department, the Claremont Police Department, the Laconia Police Department, the Londonderry Police Department, the Manchester Police Department, the Merrimack Police Department, and Amoskeag Health. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety

NJ

The New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (DL&PS), Office of the Attorney General, is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $6,000,000. The project will establish Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) programs in six areas of New Jersey. DL&PS will use available data to identify areas where LEAD would best be implemented, prioritizing sites that have been disproportionately impacted by the misuse of illicit opioids, stimulants, or other substances. DL&PS will work with each site, in conjunction with project partners and a consultant, to ensure that each program design is an approved LEAD replication. During the planning phase, DL&PS will contract with a consultant for support, training, and technical assistance; hire a project coordinator to ensure that performance measures, deliverables, and reporting requirements are satisfied; work with public safety and public health entities on data collection needs; and procure an academic partner to assist in developing data collection guidelines, oversee site data collection, and evaluate the programs. DL&PS will seek assistance with data collection from the Integrated Drug Awareness Dashboard. The project serves the State of New Jersey, which has a population of 9,288,994. The project includes partnerships between DL&PS and New Jersey’s Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services, the New Jersey Department of Health, the New Jersey State Police’s Drug Monitoring Initiative, the New Jersey Prescription Monitoring Program, and the New Jersey Coordinator for Addiction Responses and Enforcement Strategies. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project also provides an opportunity to build trust between law enforcement and the community.

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New Jersey State Parole Board

NJ

The New Jersey State Parole Board (NJSPB) is applying for a Category 2 award in the amount of $3,278,813. The FY 2021 COSSAP-New Jersey State Parole Board project will provide peer recovery-based services to individuals with substance use disorder who are under parole supervision, as well as expand Rutgers University’s current Intensive Recovery Treatment Support (IRTS) program and create a team of providers specifically dedicated to the needs of individuals under NJSPB supervision. The target population to be served under this grant will be a minimum of 110 adult offenders released from New Jersey state correctional facilities to parole supervision residing in any one of New Jersey’s 21 counties. Medium-to-high-risk offenders will be identified prior to their release from prison and will be referred, when released on parole, to receive IRTS services with the aid of a Peer Health Navigator. The project includes a partnership with Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care. Priority considerations addressed in this application include protecting the public from crime and evolving threats, building trust between law enforcement and the community, and serving individuals residing in high-poverty areas.

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North Carolina State Department of Health and Human Services

NC

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services (NC DHHS) will implement evidence-based strategies to reduce the rate of opioid overdose associated with individuals involved in the local justice system. NC DHHS will competitively subaward nine sites to implement pre-arrest diversion programs, jail-based overdose prevention education and naloxone upon release, jail-based medication assisted treatment, and connections to care upon release. Six sites will be new projects and three sites will involve expanding or enhancing existing projects. The state will collaborate with Dr. Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Social Medicine as the research partner for the project.

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Oconee County

SC

The purpose of this program is to design and implement a collaborative intervention strategy that provides (pre-booking or post-booking) treatment alternative-to-incarceration programs serving individuals at high risk for overdose or substance abuse utilizing evidence-based recovery support services (transitional/recovery housing and peer support) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). To meet these objectives, the proposed initiative will provide: 1) assessment-based individualized treatment plans, 2) MAT (Medication Assisted Treatment), 3) transitional housing at the OARS Center, 4) cognitive behavioral therapy, and 5) peer support services. Services will be delivered in the Oconee Addiction Recovery & Solutions Center located adjacent to the Oconee Law Enforcement Center that, as a communitywide enterprise, was recently renovated for this purpose. OARS will coordinate with the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office, the Oconee County Detention Center, the Oconee County Drug Court, the 10th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, and the Center for Family Medicine to deliver the proposed initiative through: 1) the development of a comprehensive, locally driven evidence-based response to opioids, stimulants, and other substances with expanded access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services; 2) supporting law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs for nonviolent drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders; 3) needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders; 4) the use of evidenced-based treatment practices; and 5) rigorous program evaluation by Clemson University providing feedback and improvement opportunities.

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Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services

OH

The Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) applied under Category 2 on behalf of the State of Ohio for grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000 for the First Responder Diversion Programs in Ohio project. Through this grant, first responder diversion (FRD) programs will be created and/or expanded in rural and urban areas across Ohio. The project serves Cuyahoga, Fairfield, Franklin, Hamilton, Lawrence, Lorain, and Mansfield counties. Federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones and high-poverty areas were a consideration in identifying several of the pilot sites. The project partners include OCJS, Cordata, Talbert House, the University of Cincinnati, and drug task forces in participating FRD sites.

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Ohio State Board of Pharmacy

OH

The Ohio Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) - Investigation and Enforcement Project will hire four Board of Pharmacy Agents to review data in the state’s PDMP, known as Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS), to identify healthcare providers who may be in violation of Ohio law or administrative rules and conduct investigations of such providers, operate a pre-criminal intervention program, and conduct training on the use of OARRS for law enforcement as part of active investigations. Additionally, the project will improve the overall quality and accuracy of PDMP data by purchasing analytics software and a subscription services that enhances the Board’s ability to match prescriber data in the system.

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Onslow County

NC

Onslow County is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $899,943. The Onslow County COSSAP 2021 project will provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT), therapeutic counseling, and recovery case management in the Onslow County Detention Center (OCDC). The three target populations are opioid-addicted pregnant women, those currently receiving MAT from a community provider when booked into OCDC, and inmates initially assessed with an opioid dependency and a misdemeanor conviction. In addition, each individual will be connected to appropriate MAT, evidence-based therapeutic counseling, and recovery support services in the community upon release. These services will include recovery housing, health, education/training, and employment support coordinated by the recovery support case manager and a certified peer support specialist. This project serves Onslow County, which has a population of 211,881. The project includes partnerships between Southern Health Partners, Oxford House, Women/Children Housing, Hope is Alive, Coastal Carolina Community College and its Adult High School, NCWorks Career Center, the Onslow County Public Health Department, Goshen Medical Center, the Onslow County Department of Social Services, ACT Associates, and Integrated Family Services.

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Page County Government

VA

The County of Page is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $600,000. The Page County Jail Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Enhancement Re-Entry (JMATER) Program will address the growing opioid problem and the negative consequences of substance misuse and related crimes through evidence-based treatment and recovery services, peer support, and abstinence monitoring. The JMATER program will expand and enhance the current Jail MAT Re-Entry (JMATR) Program by adding in-house treatment and recovery services by hiring two dedicated substance use treatment staff members—a re-entry case manager and a substance use disorder therapist. These positions will allow for more timely responses to the treatment needs of program participants. Given the increasing pattern of drug misuse in Page County, referrals to JMATER are expected to exceed 50 eligible high-risk/high-need participants in the first year. Current trends indicate most referrals will be for probation violations on possession of Schedule I or II substances or prescription drugs as well as initial drug possession charges. The JMATER Program will provide 24-hour emergency/crisis intervention, case management, individual/group therapy, peer support, access to inpatient detoxification and residential treatment centers, transitional housing, an intensive outpatient program, trauma-informed services, and access to medication-assisted treatment induction and follow-up care through a telehealth system. The enhanced JMATER Program will help to reduce the substantial jail overcrowding and high arrest rates in Page County. This project serves Page County, a rural Virginia community with a total population of approximately 24,000. The project includes partnerships between local organizations and community-based partners, the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Corrections, Strength in Peers, Gemeinshaft Home, the Page County Sheriff's Office Foundation, and the Town of Luray Police Department. This project will engage Dr. Debra Stanley as the evaluation partner for this project. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the fact that the targeted county is a high-poverty qualified opportunity zone rural area serving an economically distressed community.

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Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners

FL

COSSAP funding supports a care coordinator/housing specialist assisting Clients in finding a recovery housing placement using Recovery Housing Vouchers. Recovery support services are provided by engagement with a peer recovery support specialist and using the enhancement funding through the Recovery Support Services Funds. This intervention program prioritizes and expedites recovery support services to individuals at high risk for overdose. The Office of Behavioral Health and Substance Use Disorders (OBHSUD) seeks to fund a comprehensive person-centered, recovery-oriented approach with the goal of ensuring housing stability to support persons involved with the criminal justice system who have a substance use disorder. This demonstration program focuses on achieving housing stability given its key predictive value in achieving long-term recovery outcomes. The program team participates and works closely with the County’s strategic government and community partners as well as its research partner, Florida Atlantic University, to define and measure housing stability standards, and other recovery support interventions in the recovery residence environment in order to determine their impact on long-term recovery outcomes.

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Pennsylvania Department of Corrections

PA

The Pennsylvania Department of Corrections will focus on persons reentering the community from Pennsylvania Department of Corrections facilities who are high-frequency utilizers of services across systems (e.g., justice, health care, social services). Project efforts will focus on improving data sharing across relevant entities in the Commonwealth, with formation of a stakeholder team to advise on naloxone distribution, data sharing systems, and administrative protocols. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Pennsylvania State Police

PA

The Pennsylvania State Police will use funds to implement Project TRIAD, which will synchronize innovative, technology-driven enforcement strategies, leveraging information received through community input. Project TRIAD is named for its three component parts: Component 1–Targeted Enforcement; Component 2–Problem Oriented Policing through Community Partnerships; and Component 3–Public Outreach. In addition, a research component will be funded to assess impact.

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Pinellas County dba Board of County Commissioners

FL

The Pinellas County CARE Team Expansion will enhance current overdose response by increasing connections and engagements in community substance use treatment services, providing peer support to overdose survivors and families, conducting overdose fatality reviews to identify trends and potential gaps in the system of care, and increasing first responder and community access to naloxone. This project serves Pinellas County, Florida, with an estimated population of 970,532. The project includes partnerships between Pinellas County Human Services and Pinellas County Safety and Emergency Services.

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Public Health Authority of Cabarrus County

NC

The Public Health Authority of Cabarrus County is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $900,000. Through the Providing Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) and Recovery Support Services to Individuals with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) project, Cabarrus Health Alliance (CHA), the local health department for Cabarrus and Rowan counties, will provide MAT to 50 uninsured individuals with OUD residing in the counties. The program will combine pharmacotherapy (via buprenorphine-naloxone), behavioral health treatment, voluntary access, recovery support services, and low-barrier access for participation. CHA will receive referrals for detainees post-release from the Cabarrus County Detention Center (CCDC) and recruit other MAT patients through its internal syringe access program and MAT program for pregnant women with OUD. The program will expand local capacity for care beyond pregnant women with OUD to adults with OUD; increase the number of individuals with OUD receiving MAT in combination with behavioral health services; and decrease opioid overdoses among participants of the MAT program. The project serves Cabarrus and Rowan counties, with a total population of 358,541. Parts of both counties are U.S. Human Resources and Services Administration-designated Medically Underserved Areas and Health Professional Shortage Areas in primary, dental, and mental health care and are also designated as High-Poverty Areas. The project includes partnerships with CCDC, the Stepping Up Initiative, and Atrium Health Addiction Services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include disproportionate impact by the misuse of opioids, protecting the public from crime and evolving threats, and benefiting individuals residing in high-poverty areas or persistent-poverty counties.

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Pueblo Department of Public Health and Environment

CO

The Pueblo County Department of Public Health and Environment (PDPHE) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $899,280. The Pueblo County Partners for Data (PCPD) and Substance Abuse Response project will expand substance use and treatment datasets using quantitative and qualitative data from existing PCPD partner agencies (safety, health systems, harm reduction, schools, and social services) and new partnerships; facilitate data sharing and integration among partners; cultivate community partner and member use of the data to recognize gaps and make real-time decisions to reduce the impact of substance use on individuals and communities, reduce overdose deaths, and mitigate impacts on crime victims; enhance data infrastructure, including the data software and hardware to effectively manage a larger quantity of data; provide technical assistance to partners to collect data and assist with data organization in a compatible manner; disseminate data to the public, community partners, and community leaders so they are informed and able to make decisions based on substance use trends; and ensure data collection, analysis, and dissemination incorporate a health equity lens with the focus on reducing bias and disparities. The project will be carried out by a core team of five individuals working in the Office of Policy and Strategic Implementation at PDPHE. Deliverables include an enhanced data dashboard with additional quantitative measures such as MAT encounters, social determinants of health, prescriptions, and qualitative measures incorporating local stories; a data network where community partners, members, and researchers can request datasets based on research questions and programmatic or policy needs; a governance agreement to outline how to share, format, translate, link, and integrate data while adhering to appropriate privacy requirements to enhance data infrastructure; and an inclusive Health Equity in Data plan including community member involvement to guide data collection, analysis, and dissemination. The project serves Pueblo County, which has an estimated population of 168,424. The project includes partnerships between the PCPD and the District Attorney’s Office, the county Department of Human Services, local law enforcement agencies, hospitals, Pueblo Triple Aim Corporation, a federally qualified health center, a transitional housing center, the local fire department, and a behavioral health provider. The project will engage an external evaluation team. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project will also support efforts to protect the public from crime and evolving threats, promote civil rights, and build trust between law enforcement and the community.

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Rockland County, NY

NY

The County of Rockland, New York, applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $899,964. The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program will start with a pilot with the largest law enforcement agency in Rockland County and then roll out to other police agencies. The goal is to improve public safety, reduce the number of low-level substance-using offenders from entering the criminal justice system, address issues of disproportionality, and strengthen the relationships between prosecution, law enforcement, and the community. This project serves Rockland County, New York. The project includes partnerships between the District Attorney’s Office, Town of Clarkstown Police Department (for the pilot), all local law enforcement agencies in Rockland County, the Rockland Council on Alcoholism and other Drug Dependence, and the Samaritan Daytop Village. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Ross County Health District

OH

Ross County Health District applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Ross County Peer Recovery Service Center will expand access to treatment and recovery support services for individuals at high risk of overdose involving opioids, stimulants, and other substances through a new program of countywide coordination of recovery support services. System coordination will occur early in the individual’s involvement with the criminal justice system, identifying key recovery sites for navigation and service connection. The project will employ a dedicated peer recovery services coordinator who works out of the Ross County Community Action Commission (RCCAC) through a newly developed service line: a countywide Peer Recovery Service Center (PRS Center). In addition, dedicated recovery housing capacity will be a part of the recovery support system, as will an enhanced network of peer recovery supporters. The Ross County Peer Recovery Service Center will enhance the applicant’s current integrated service delivery system that promotes public health, sustained recovery, and safety for the community. This project serves Ross County, with a population of 76,666. The project includes partnerships between the Ross County Health District, RCCAC, Ross County Sheriff’s Office and Ross County Jail, Ross County Probation, Post Overdose Response Team, Ross County Common Pleas Court, Ohio University-Chillicothe, the Peer Recovery and Outreach Center.

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Rutherford County

TN

Rutherford County is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $471,807. The Rutherford County Emergency Medical Services (RCEMS) COSSAP Program will improve tracking, analysis, and dissemination of medicolegal data as relates to drug-related deaths and improve death investigation procedures within Rutherford County. The project will fund personnel to implement and manage the new Office of the State Medical Examiner (OSCME)-provided comprehensive case management system by collecting real-time comprehensive information regarding death investigations to include specifically overdose and drug-related deaths; and form a comprehensive opioid, stimulant, and substance misuse fatality review by liaison with OSCME, law enforcement officials, public health agencies, and other interested entities. The two new medicolegal death investigators will be available to assist the Operations Support Death Investigations Supervisor and the County Medical Examiner with those cases that do not reach the threshold for full autopsy performance but do require a thorough external examination with toxicology testing. This would allow for improved efficiency and timeliness for forensic results required for death certification, reporting to investigating law enforcement agencies, reporting to family of the decedents, and for any subsequent adjudication procedures and final disposition arrangements. Tracking of new drugs into the jurisdiction during review of toxicology reports on all medical examiner forensic cases will guide local and regional law enforcement efforts as it relates to crime prevention and identification of evolving threats. The project serves Rutherford County, which has a population of approximately 350,000. The project includes partnerships between RCEMS, OSCME, and the Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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San Luis Obispo County Behavioral Health Department

CA

The County of San Luis Obispo Behavioral Health Department applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $900,000. The San Luis Obispo County Behavioral Health Program will provide recovery support services in the form of a recovery residence stay (drug- and alcohol-free living) to all COSSAP participants in San Luis Obispo County who need this level of care. All recovery residences provided funding with this grant will be MAT compliant in order to serve those with opiate use disorders. In addition, this grant will provide for a Behavioral Health Clinician III (Licensed Practitioner of Healing Arts) to conduct assessments of individuals leaving emergency rooms after an overdose and for the law enforcement Community Action Teams (CATs) who pick up individuals for early intervention in the community, as well as assessing those arrested, cited, and released from the county jail for drug offenses. A peer recovery coach will also be hired to provide important peer support, including modeling hope and recovery, mentoring, as well as engagement and community networking support, which has previously not been available from the agency. This project serves 200 individuals in the County of San Luis Obispo The project includes partnerships between Superior Court, Probation and Sheriff's Department, and local community hospital stakeholders.

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Screven County Sheriff's Office

GA

The Screven County Sheriff's Office applied for Category 1c tribal/rural grant funding in the amount of $587,825. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) employ needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders, (2) expand diversion programs for drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders, (3) deliver an evidenced-based prevention program, and (4) offer rigorous program evaluation providing feedback and improvement opportunities. This project serves Screven County, Georgia, with a population of 14,300. The project includes partnerships between the Community Service Board of Middle Georgia, Ogeechee Division; Drug Court for the Ogeechee Judicial Circuit; and scientific partners. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a 100 percent rural county, high-poverty area, and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Seattle King County Department of Public Health

WA

Seattle and King County (PH) requested funding in the amount of $1,200,000 over a 36-month period for the King County Jail Buprenorphine Inductions (KCJBI) project. This project serves King County, with a population of approximately 2.25 million. With the requested funding, KCJBI will initiate incarcerated individuals with opioid use disorder onto medication-assisted treatment with buprenorphine. To expand the MAT program, the KCJBI project will initiate individuals onto MAT during incarceration. This will be accomplished by utilizing requested funds to increase nursing and corrections officer staffing needed to execute the project. At release, individuals will be connected to a MAT provider in the community for ongoing treatment; of note, King County received DOJ COAP funding in 2019 to hire two substance use disorder specialists and one program assistant to assist in the delivery of this service. This project includes partnerships between PH, King County Department of Adult and Juvenile Detention, and community MAT providers. Priority considerations for this award include serving an area that has been disproportionately impacted by the use of illicit substances, a high-poverty area, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Seneca County Sheriff's Office

OH

Seneca County is located in north-central Ohio (population 55,178 and population density of 103 persons per square mile) and, like most rural communities in the region, suffers from underemployment, decreasing revenues, and high rates of substance abuse and mental illness. Consistent with OJP priority areas, Seneca County has a high rate of primary treatment admissions for opioids, high rates of overdose deaths, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers. The purpose of the project is to better address the many needs of the population in Seneca County by providing (1) increased in-house (jail) access to therapy, (2) recovery support during reentry, and (3) transportation, in particular, to outpatient therapy following release from jail. The project includes building upon and expanding an existing partnership between SCSO and Firelands Counseling and Recovery Services, a recognized community mental health center in Ohio accredited by the Joint Commission. Priority considerations addressed in this application include postbooking treatment alternative to incarceration for individuals at high risk of overdose or substance abuse; evidence-based treatment provision, including MAT (naltrexone); and recovery support services. Drs. Holly Ventura Miller and J. Mitchell Miller from the University of North Florida will serve as the evaluators for the proposed initiative. This proposal includes a comprehensive mixed-methods process and outcome evaluation incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research techniques. The proposed project will infuse sincerely needed resources into one of the communities most devastated by the still-rising opioids crisis and provide examples of data collection and evaluation steps that could be replicated in other criminal justice and public health settings.

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Seneca Nation of Indians

NY

The Seneca Nation of Indians applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $595,366.30. The Seneca Nation’s Native Connections Clubhouse Program (SNNCP) will provide opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse education, prevention, and intervention programming that connects law enforcement agencies with K-12 students and provides ongoing community support systems for at-risk youth. Objective one is to provide school administrations, students, and families with access to law enforcement agencies through the School Resource Officer Program; connecting K-12 students to opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse education, prevention, and intervention programming and resources. Objective two is to provide Native American youth and families with access to evidenced-based opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse prevention and intervention strategies/tools/programs beyond traditional school/business hours by opening an after-hour’s safe place, the Clubhouse, for a minimum of 25 hours per week on the Allegany Territory. This project serves the Seneca Nation of Indians Tribe. The project includes partnerships between Lakeshore Central Schools and Silver Central Schools.

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Sierra County

NM

Sierra County in New Mexico will develop a crisis intervention team to assist law enforcement officers in developing a law enforcement diversion program, provide jail-based opioid and behavioral health services, provide skill-building and treatment, assist incarcerated individuals transitioning to community-based services once released from custody, add community behavior health treatment planning and services, and conduct opioid education programs in schools. This project will engage Ann Hays Egan of New Ventures Consulting as the research partner for this project.

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Snohomish County

WA

The Snohomish County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office (PAO) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The project will enable the expansion of the Snohomish County Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) project, a cross-sector collaborative effort involving the PAO, the Everett City Attorney, the Everett and Lynnwood Police Departments, the County Executive, the Mayors of Everett and Lynnwood, and the Snohomish County Public Defenders Association. The LEAD program utilizes both pre- and post-arrest diversions: pre-arrest referrals are made by both police and prosecutors who identify individuals who they believe would benefit from a referral to community-based services; post-arrest diversions are made by officers who have grounds to arrest individuals who have committed LEAD-eligible violations. Expansion will enable the county to increase the number of individuals diverted to the program and possibly expand its geographic coverage, as several jurisdictions in the county have indicated that they would like to adopt LEAD. The goals of the program include reorienting local responses to safety, disorder, and behavioral health problems; improving public safety and health through health-oriented interventions; and reducing the number of individuals in the criminal justice system due to low-level law violations. The project serves Snohomish County, with an estimated population of 822,000. The project will include partnerships between the PAO and the Everett City Attorney, the Everett and Lynnwood Police Departments, the County Executive, the Mayors of Everett and Lynnwood, and the Snohomish County Public Defenders Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities. The project also provides an opportunity to build trust between law enforcement and the community, advance the promotion of civil rights, and benefit individuals residing in high-poverty areas.

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St. Lawrence County

NY

St. Lawrence County applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The St. Lawrence County Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program (COSSAP) utilizes patient-centered care to facilitate access to substance use treatment for individuals with opioid use disorder who are not currently getting the needed care. The program will expand harm-reduction services and recovery support opportunities, as well as increase access to communicable disease testing and preventive care to individuals in high-risk populations. Also, the program will provide essential patient-centered addiction services for the people at greatest risk for overdose. This project serves the 109,558 residents of St. Lawrence County. The project includes partnerships between St. Lawrence County Community Services, St. Lawrence Health Systems, Seaway Valley Prevention Council, the Maximizing Independent Living Center, and New Hope Transformation Ministries (dba Grace House). Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and the specific challenges that rural communities face.

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St. Mary's County

MD

The St. Mary’s County Health Department (SMCHD) is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $899,963. The St. Mary’s County Day Reporting Center project will provide community-based services and treatment to offenders under parole/probation in St. Mary’s County, Maryland. The offenders will live at home and report to the center on a daily basis. While at the center, the offenders receive various services including substance misuse counseling, anger management, moral reconation therapy, parenting skills, relapse prevention, mental health coordination, job skills, case management, educational classes, life skills, after-care planning, and touch-ups. This project serves a population of roughly 113,510 individuals in St. Mary's County. The project includes partnerships between SMCHD and St. Mary's County Detention and Rehabilitation Center (SMCDRC).

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St. Tammany Parish Government

LA

St. Tammany Parish will develop an information system to analyze and track the opioid client population across justice system and health intercepts in order to reduce cases of overdose and increase treatment and recovery service access. Key partners for this project include the 22nd Judicial District Court, the Safe Haven Advisory Board, St. Tammany Parish Hospital, the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office and Jail, and the District Attorney’s Office.

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Surry County Government

NC

Surry County Government applied for Category 1c grant funding in the amount of $595,568. The project will establish an accessible continuum of care to reduce the impact of substance use on the community. Currently, two essential components are lacking in the community: (1) data analysis to link needs, treatment, and services; apprise cost effectiveness; and track impact outcomes countywide; and (2) transportation assistance for people needing treatment. This proposal outlines a plan to implement these two critical elements. This project serves Surry County, North Carolina, which has a population of 73,232. The project includes partnerships between preventive, treatment, recovery, social, and justice service agencies in the county. Priority considerations addressed in this application include: rural, Qualified Opportunity Zones, a high rate of treatment admissions, high rates of overdose and overdose death, and a high rate of drug-related crime.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

TN

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is applying for category 2 in the amount of $6,000,000. This project will increase local community’s capacity to respond to the presence of Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) among justice involved individuals and reduce the impact of SUDs among justice involved individuals. This project will include partnerships with the Tennessee Department of Health to support the expansion of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in COSSAP jail sites and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to support Drug Endangered Children Task Forces, Field Based Drug Testing, and overdose data mapping. This project serves to support ten new implementation project sites; 1) Blount, 2) Roane, 3) Anderson, 4) Bradley, 5) Dickson, 6) Cheatham, 7) Roane, 8) Tipton, 9) Grundy and 10) Montgomery counties. Priority Considerations: Qualified Opportunity Zones: All 10 sites targeted for this COSSAP project have Qualified Opportunity Zones in their county: See Attachment 6. High-Poverty Areas or Persistent-Poverty Counties: Two of the targeted counties: Grundy and Cocke are rated by the TN Dept of Economic and Community Development as “Distressed”, while the other eight (8) counties are rated as “Transitional”. Poverty rates for all targeted counties are above the national average (12.3%) with Grundy (28.5%), Cocke (25.0%) and Bradley (18.0%) all exceeding the Statewide poverty rate of 16.7%. Address Specific Challenges That Rural Communities Face: Six of the ten sites selected have more than (50%) of their population residing in rural areas, which Grundy County having (100%) of its population residing in a rural area.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

TN

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse will: • Support six new implementation project sites (Davidson, Montgomery, Sumner, Putnam, Wilson, and Washington counties) as well as five enhancement project sites for counties that are currently COAP funded (Sullivan, Hamilton, Knox, Jefferson, and Coffee Counties). Sullivan and Hamilton Counties will (1) embed behavioral health clinicians with law enforcement; (2) provide employment readiness and connection to employment services both pre- and post-incarceration; and/or (3) deliver evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy courses. • Enhance six regional drug-endangered children response teams in Dickson, Cheatham, Lawrence, Franklin, Jefferson, and Scott Counties. Response teams will use a collaborative approach in meeting the needs of children affected by drug overdose events as well as their parents. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation will also implement a statewide prevention strategy by creating a virtual reality game with education content for students to engage with at school events. • Integrate three certified peer recovery support specialist (CPRS) positions in probation and parole offices across the state, one in each of the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. • Provide recovery support services, including recovery housing, as part of a comprehensive response. Dr. Carolyn Marie Audet and Lauren Allard will serve as the research partners for this project.

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Tippecanoe County

IN

Tippecanoe County Government is applying for a Category 1 award in the amount of $1,200,000. The NewLeaf Wellness Center and Treatment Program will intervene at the pre-trial state or post-conviction state of criminal cases by identifying mental health and addiction treatment needs and connecting those individuals with the appropriate services. It will provide needed mental health and substance misuse services to participants through Tippecanoe County Community Corrections’ newly formed NewLeaf Wellness Center. Educational and treatment services provided through NewLeaf Wellness Center will include evidenced based practices such as living in balance, relapse prevention, cognitive behavioral therapy, trauma-informed care, and moral reconation therapy. The overall goal of this project is to accomplish a reduction in recidivism, jail overcrowding, and drug-related fatalities. This project serves Tippecanoe County, Indiana, which has an estimated population of 196,195. The project includes (but is not limited to) partnerships between local law enforcement agencies, Tippecanoe County Courts, Tippecanoe County Community Corrections, Valley Oaks, Meridian Health Services, NAMI, Calla Collaborative Health, Purdue University, Court Services, and Health Call. This project will engage Tippecanoe County Community Corrections Executive Director Jason Huber as the research partner for this project.

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Town of Seekonk

MA

The Seekonk Police Department is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $798,156. The Bristol County Outreach Opioid Intervention/Mental Health Program is a law enforcement-led post-overdose outreach collaboration among eight towns in Bristol County that will facilitate access to treatment for individuals struggling with substance use disorder, as well as support for their families and friends. The program includes hiring a project coordinator/clinician and a recovery specialist to support the eight-town coalition of police departments in their efforts to provide post overdose/referral recovery support services to individuals experiencing non-fatal overdoses and those determined to be at risk for overdose. Outreach teams will conduct post-overdose home visits within 72 hours of an overdose to offer access to treatment. Outreach will also include distribution of harm reduction tool kits including naloxone. All eight towns currently use countywide overdose/referral tracking software called the Critical Incident Management System (CIMS), which tracks all fatal and non-fatal overdoses, shares data among law enforcement agencies, and documents post-overdose follow-up. The project serves the towns of Dighton, Easton, Fairhaven, Mansfield, Rehoboth, Seekonk, and Somerset in Bristol County, which have an aggregate population of 136,738. The project includes partnerships between the municipal police departments in Dighton, Easton, Fairhaven, Mansfield, Rehoboth, Seekonk, and Somerset. The project will engage Kelley Research Associates as a research partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Ulster County

NY

Ulster County is applying for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The High-Risk Mitigation Team (HRMT) will increase ORACLE’s capacity to respond to overdose scenes by providing crisis intervention training (CIT) to officers throughout Ulster County. The project will develop the HRMT to work directly with ORACLE, providing certified peer advocate services (CRPA) and intensive case management within the city of Kingston, New York. The project will also develop an initial alert system for first responders in Kingston to alert the ORACLE team of overdose when it happens. This project serves Ulster County, a community of approximately 177,573 people. The project includes partnerships between the Ulster County Department of Health and Mental Health, Ulster County Sheriff’s Office, and ORACLE team. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin or other opioids and a high rate of overdose deaths.

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Unified Court System of New York State

NY

The New York State Unified Court System (UCS) is applying for Category 2 funding in the amount of $5,783,403. The New York Rural Opioid Court Initiative will implement opioid courts (OICs)—pre-plea court programs that expedite treatment and recovery services for offenders at high risk for overdose—in eight USDA-designated rural counties in New York State (Sullivan, Greene, Delaware, Genesee, Cortland, Columbia, Chenango, and Lewis). The project provides the infrastructure, planning, and evaluation of evidence-based treatment interventions, supervision, and recovery supportive services to successfully divert defendants with substance use disorder at risk of overdose. The OICs’ development will be supported locally by engaging in Sequential Intercept Model mapping in each jurisdiction and by the establishment of an OIC Center of Excellence, which will provide guidance to the selected counties in applying best practices to address the issues of polysubstance use disorders, mental health, and trauma. The project will also improve court supervision and access to treatment and peers through teleservices and will engage with drug testing laboratories to enhance testing for complex synthetic drugs to target effective supervision, treatment, and supportive services. The goal of the project is to stabilize defendants while an appropriate disposition of their case is determined so that participants may connect with treatment and other services that produce behavior change. The project serves Sullivan, Greene, Delaware, Genesee, Cortland, Columbia, Chenango, and Lewis counties in New York State, with a combined population of 408,060. The project includes partnerships with the New York Office of Addiction Services and Supports and Policy Research Associates. The project will engage NPC Research as an evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Wake County

NC

The Wake County Sheriff’s Office (WCSO) will develop an Opioid Abuse Management Program, which aims to reduce the high rate of opioid overdoses and opioid fatalities in Wake County. The Opioid Abuse Management program will be overseen by a Program Coordinator who will implement and oversee the progress of the program. Funding through the program will ensure that all deputies are equipped with naloxone to administer and reverse the effects of an overdose. The program will also provide handheld narcotics analyzers and necessary accessories, which will enable deputies to quickly identify suspected controlled substances in emergency situations. Tablets will also be funded through the program and will be provided to deputies responding to substance abuse calls. These tablets will provide a direct connection to Alliance Health Access and Information Line, where deputies will receive immediate virtual assistance from a social services professional. Tablets will also be used in the Detox Unit by project staff for reporting and data management, as well as by residents housed in the Detox Unit to assist with job applications, substance abuse treatment programs, and telehealth visits. WCSO recognizes that our duty of care must not stop upon a resident’s release and therefore will implement collaborative partnerships with behavioral health clinics and treatment providers to expand our comprehensive efforts to respond to, treat, and support those impacted by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other drugs of abuse once released from our care. WCSO will procure a software company to develop and implement a Substance Abuse Disorder Management Platform that will track treatment during incarceration and upon release. This software will connect the WCSO with outside healthcare professionals to better understand patterns and to share crucial information.

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Wayne County Sheriff's Office

NC

The Wayne County Detention Center, through the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to provide best practices in developing, implementing, and sustaining a jail-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program during incarceration and upon release. The benefits include stemming the cycle of arrest, incarceration, and release typically linked to substance use disorders; helping to maintain a safe and secure jail for inmates and staff; and reducing costs, since data indicate that MAT for opioid use disorders is cost-effective. This project serves Wayne County, North Carolina, which is the sixth largest agricultural county in the state with over 116,000 residents. The project includes partnerships between Southern Health Partners, Wayne County’s Day Reporting Center, and Dixon Social Interactive Services, Inc. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and persistent poverty.

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West Virginia Division of Administrative Services, Justice and Community Services

WV

The Justice and Community Services (JCS) section of the West Virginia Division of Administrative Services seeks to: • Expand and improve the state’s Handle with Care (HWC) initiative. The HWC initiative supports children exposed to trauma and violence through improved communication and collaboration between law enforcement and schools/child care agencies and mental health providers, and connects families, schools, and communities to mental health services; • Expand and enhance the West Virginia law enforcement assisted diversion program, which diverts those suspected of low-level drug and prostitution offenses away from jail and prosecution into case management, legal coordination, and other supportive services. This aspect of the proposed project will focus heavily on the counties of Braxton, Calhoun, Clay, Gilmer, Webster, and Wirt, which currently lack diversion programs; and • Enhance and expand telehealth services for those in underserved and geographically isolated communities. Similar to the diversion aspect, the telehealth aspect of the proposed project would expand services to Braxton, Calhoun, Clay, Gilmer, Webster, and Wirt Counties. These services will include psychiatric evaluations with treatment plan development, individual and group counseling, cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication-assisted treatment (including buprenorphine and naltrexone), and peer recovery support services. JCS has partnered with the West Virginia Office of Research and Strategic Planning, West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources Bureau for Behavioral Health, and the West Virginia Office of Drug Control Policy in the implementation, monitoring, oversight, and sustainment of the proposed project.

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Winnebago County

WI

The Winnebago County District Attorney’s Office (WCDAO) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $1,897,863. Stimulant and Opioid Addiction Recovery (SOAR) will develop a diversion strategy using evidence-based components for people with substance use disorder (SUD) and felony drug-possession cases and will improve data infrastructure, engaging stakeholders that include local justice, health, and service agencies and community-based service providers. SOAR will operate in two phases, the first beginning with the defendant being arrested or summoned to an initial court appearance. Phase 1 includes a 24/7 drug-monitoring program; Phase 2 consists of a post-charge diversion agreement. The project will collaborate with a recovery-services and training facility in Winnebago County that will provide certified peer support specialists. A local pharmacy will provide naltrexone shots to participants who are interested in pursuing that path. Pragmatic field tests of process improvements will document performance and feasibility of implementation. The project’s goal is to identify and respond to the needs of persons with SUD who are currently excluded from diversion programs. Deliverables include improved data collection to characterize and respond to SUD; a screening tool for treatment and diversion for persons with SUD; and improvements in domains important to the justice system, social-service agencies, the community, and SUD-involved persons, such as increased treatment engagement and reduced recidivism. The project serves Winnebago County, a largely rural county with a population of approximately 170,000. The project includes partnerships between WCDAO and the Winnebago County Department of Human Services, the Winnebago County Department of Public Health, Options Lab, the Winnebago County Circuit Court, the Wisconsin State Public Defender’s Office, and Fox Valley Peer-based Response, Information, Support, and Maintenance. The project will engage the New York University's Marron Institute as a research partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

WI

The Wisconsin Department of Justice (DOJ) will support the implementation of local law enforcement assisted diversion (LEAD) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs in jails. Five pre-booking diversion sites using the LEAD model will be selected to provide diversion to treatment at the pre-arrest or post-arrest stages. Nine jail-based sites will be selected to provide non-narcotic, non-addictive injectable MAT to an inmate in the days immediately preceding re-entry to the community. The MAT program will include community-based care coordination for inmates exiting the county or tribal jail and rely on evidence-based, trauma-informed practices for substance use disorder treatment. This project will engage the Wisconsin DOJ's Bureau of Justice Information and Analysis as the research partner for this project.

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Worcester County

MD

The Worcester County Health Department (WCHD) is applying for Category 1 funding in the amount of $600,000. The project will enable the countywide expansion of the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program launched in July 2021 in Ocean Pines through the addition of two case managers and support staff to assist in data collection and partner coordination. The LEAD program will work with other first responders, including fire department and emergency medical services (EMS) staff members. This expansion will include collaboration with the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, targeting high utilizers of law enforcement and other first responder services across Worcester County. The additional case management staff will provide linkages to care, social services, and recovery support services to appropriate individuals identified by fire/EMS professionals and law enforcement officers. The expansion of the LEAD program will increase access to treatment for individuals who are abusing or misusing opioids, stimulants, and other substances and those who have co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders. It will also benefit law enforcement and first responder systems by redirecting high utilizers to more appropriate services. The project serves Worcester County, a largely rural county with a population of 52,276. The project will include partnerships between WCHD and the Worcester County Office of the State’s Attorney, the Ocean Pines Police Department, the Worcester County Local Behavioral Health Authority, the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, the Eastern Shore Criminal Justice Academy, and the Governor’s Office of Crime Prevention, Youth and Victim Services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin, opioids, and stimulants; high rates of overdose deaths; and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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York County

PA

The York/Adams Drug and Alcohol Commission proposes to establish a new program to connect persons leaving prison with the appropriate evidence-based treatment and support services, which may include medication-assisted treatment; connect individuals who are on work-release with treatment and nontreatment services; and establish an integrated data system containing all law enforcement naloxone utilizations, emergency medical services naloxone utilizations, and hospital emergency department admissions and encourage prescription drug monitoring program usage.

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